The Go-Go’s on Rockpalast in Berlin 11/3/82

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cipuMRK7v3E

November 26, 2021. Tags: , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Rick Beato: TOP 10 LED ZEPPELIN RIFFS RANKED

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNpVOw7X_Z8

October 29, 2021. Tags: , , . Music. 1 comment.

The English Touring Opera has just fired 14 of its musicians because they are white

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/columnists/2021/09/19/sacking-white-members-english-touring-opera-shows-woke-will/

The sacking of white members of the English Touring Opera shows how woke will destroy the arts

I for one would never go to watch an orchestra just because it had been lauded for diversity

By Zoe Strimpel

September 19, 2021

As a child and teenager in Boston, USA, I played in various orchestras. I didn’t much like it, largely because I found it boring, thankless and tiring. Rehearsals were long. Sometimes I didn’t like the music that had been selected: why had the conductor chosen another obscure piece by César Franck? But one thing that I had the luxury of never having to worry about was the ethnic makeup of the players and my own fate auditioning as a young white girl. As it happened, in the youth orchestra scene back then, the top symphonies and seats were dominated by children whose parents were Russian or Chinese. This was not a source of much comment; it’s just how it was.

Since then, we have sunk into such a quagmire of identity politics that even orchestras are now selecting players not because they are the best, but because of their skin colour. The English Touring Opera (ETO) has dropped 14 white musicians in order to increase the ‘diversity’ of the company. Aged between 40 and 60, they’ve been told their contracts will not be renewed because of ‘diversity guidance’ from Arts Council England, which gives the ETO £1.78 million a year.

Arts Council England, one of the most woke funding bodies in the land, protested lamely, arguing that it never meant to get players sacked. “We are now in conversation with ETO to ensure no funding criteria have been breached,” it said. Err. Perhaps this has been a valuable wake-up call for the Arts Council: what did it expect? If you insist on exporting the warped logic of critical race theory, pressuring arts organisations to prioritise skin colour over all else, you can hardly be surprised when they respond like this. If the ETO’s policy of race-based contract non-renewal smacks of the kinds of policies my own grandparents faced in post-Nuremberg Laws Germany, then that is entirely the fault of the institutional bigwigs slurping away at the woke Kool-Aid.

The hideous optics of the ETO debacle offer a particularly stark reminder of how in the era of wokedom, the arts are doomed. Sure, the arts have a social component, but they are fundamentally rooted in creativity and talent, and they must delight, rivet or intrigue. They are not meant to be primarily didactic. I for one would never go to watch an orchestra just because it had been lauded for diversity. I would never read a book because it had been commissioned as part of a ‘diversity and inclusion programme’ and I would never admire a work of art simply because it had emerged from a person of the right colour. Yet such ideas are gaining popularity: earlier this summer, Labour MP Janet Daby, a former shadow minister for faiths, women and equalities, put to then-Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden the merits of issuing “mandatory diversity quotas” for artists that appear in publicly funded galleries like Tate Britain. Thankfully, that quota hasn’t yet been mandated, but under a different government it might well be.

If the ETO rejig seems particularly shocking, the arts have in fact been at it for ages. Back in 2018, Penguin Random House sent a stern email round to agents and employees: the new commissioning policy would have to fall into line with diversity targets, with diversity defined by sexual identity, skin colour and whether one was able-bodied or not. The “company-wide goal” was “for both our new hires and the authors we acquire to reflect UK society by 2025”. Aside from the utter madness of assuming that the percentage of people able to write excellent books should map onto the demographic makeup of British society, this dictum showed that from now on, the narrowest, most box-ticking form of ‘diversity’ – what you are rather than who you are – would determine Penguin’s contribution to literature.

The sprawling diversity and inclusion drives our funding bodies, arts organisations and publishers, who have fallen over themselves to instigate from part of a broader domain of deranged and misapplied moral virtue. One aspect of this became particularly apparent during #MeToo, when man after man found to have a polluted past was chopped from ballet companies, films and comedy careers. I can see why men who sexually molest women might be kicked out of offices. But films? Ballet shows?

A couple of years ago I did a debate at the Oxford Union, arguing that art should not be judged by the biography of the artist, because on that score, there would be no art at all from any time before about five minutes ago. But also because it’s simply wrong: it flattens creative work, with all its many and unpredictable interpretations, into something chilly, Manichean and moralistic.

We won the debate, but only just: there were many who were adamant that art was indistinguishable from the moral virtue of its creator. For today’s arts institutions, virtue and the skin colour of artists have become one and the same thing. Not only is this an immoral equation, as the ETO clearout showed with crystal clarity, but it’s a death knell for the very notion of artistic quality.

October 16, 2021. Tags: , , , , , , . Cancel culture, Dumbing down, Music, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

FSO – Star Wars Episode IV – “Here they come!” (John Williams)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJaz5XhSjwc

October 14, 2021. Tags: , , . Movies, Music, Star Wars. Leave a comment.

John Williams & Wiener Philharmoniker – “Main Title” from “Star Wars: A New Hope”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54hoKbTWon4

October 12, 2021. Tags: , , . Movies, Music, Star Wars. Leave a comment.

WASTED ON THE WAY – CROSBY, STILLS, AND NASH (Kudyapi Band Social Distancing Cover)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovoXNhuds7s

October 4, 2021. Tags: , , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Billy Howse and his friend perform “Abracadabra” by the Steve Miller Band

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0GtJl2rDiI

October 1, 2021. Tags: , , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Colt Clark and the Quarantine Kids play “Fortunate Son” by Creedence Clearwater Revival

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MQ10Dq410I

September 30, 2021. Tags: , , , , . Music. 1 comment.

Colt Clark and the Quarantine Kids play “Won’t Get Fooled Again” by the Who

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7evJQKNKUBw

September 30, 2021. Tags: , , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Colt Clark and the Quarantine Kids play a Rolling Stones Mini-Concert

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlAAx3f6WKM

September 27, 2021. Tags: , , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Colt Clark and the Quarantine Kids play “Hurts So Good” by John Mellencamp

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFeWJ-SMWWM

September 27, 2021. Tags: , , , , , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Glenn Case covers “Your Imagination” by Daryl Hall and John Oates

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vn9RSyDzyHQ

September 27, 2021. Tags: , , , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Travis Bigwood, Aubrey Mullins, and Skylan Bracey cover Jackson Browne’s “Somebody’s Baby”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBvtiRHz_VU

September 27, 2021. Tags: , , , , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Rick Beato says “Never Gonna Let You Go” by Sérgio Mendes is “The Most COMPLEX Pop Song of All Time”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZnRxTW8GxT8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQ_NAXaiI2Q

June 24, 2021. Tags: , , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Rosanna cover by Richie Castellano and Andy Ascolese

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f94U-rHmlhI

May 29, 2021. Tags: , , , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Tom MacDonald – Fake Woke (Lyrics)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBJioHTCYXs

February 2, 2021. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , . Music, Political correctness, Racism, Sexism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

YouTuber Media Bear: “I Wear My Face Mask in the Car” (parody of “I Wear My Sunglasses at Night”)

I did not create this video. I’m just posting it here so people will see it.

If you want to see something that I did create, I recommend this: Here are 100 reasons why I’m against the COVID-19 lockdowns

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DDXG-dHugc

And for those of you who may to too young to know the original by Corey Hart, which the above parody is based on, here it is:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2LTL8KgKv8

May 27, 2020. Tags: , , , , , , , , , . COVID-19, Humor, Music. Leave a comment.

YouTuber P Palm: Covid 19 Parody of Steely Dan — Hey Nineteen

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkZj7olsA-M

May 21, 2020. Tags: , , , , . COVID-19, Music. Leave a comment.

My newest meme is a picture of Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend. The caption says, “I hope I get old before I die.” Please feel free to share it.

Click here to see a bigger version: https://imgflip.com/i/428gfi

May 21, 2020. Tags: , , , , , , , , , . COVID-19, Music. 4 comments.

Remy: Surfin’ USA (Beach Boys Lockdown Parody)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3r-6s6cRGgA

May 15, 2020. Tags: , , , . COVID-19, Humor, Music. Leave a comment.

YouTuber InVoca / by Raúl Irabién: Coronavirus Rhapsody (based on Bohemian Rhapsody) – Covid19

InVoca / by Raúl Irabién

CORONAVIRUS RHAPSODY

Vocals: Raúl Irabién

Lyrics: Dana Jay Bein (@danajaybein)

Video post production: Daniel Reyes (@danielreyesmx)

Audio master: Armando Olabuenaga

Based on original song “Bohemian Rhapsody” by Freddy Mercury and Queen

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Eo9M4-BrJA

April 13, 2020. Tags: , , , , , , . COVID-19, Humor, Music. 1 comment.

Randa and Danica Meierhenry – I Just Wanna See My Friends

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OKy7Tbay4tI

March 27, 2020. Tags: , , . COVID-19, Music. Leave a comment.

R.I.P. Ginger Baker

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Gze0PxDKgQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iF-pMingp6A

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUxYzfLZkpc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=794WnKLQ2Yc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DES2KOq5SoE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYYeM_t6b5c

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCc00pX_pFA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbx2Os3wPTg

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/06/arts/music/ginger-baker-dead.html

Ginger Baker, Superstar Rock Drummer With Cream, Is Dead at 80

October 6, 2019

Ginger Baker, who helped redefine the role of the drums in rock and became a superstar in the process, died on Sunday in a hospital in southeastern England. He was 80.

His family confirmed his death in a post on his official Twitter account.

Mr. Baker drew worldwide attention for his approach to the drums, as sophisticated as it was forceful, when he teamed with the guitarist Eric Clapton and the bassist Jack Bruce in the hugely successful British band Cream in 1966.

Keith Moon of the Who was more uninhibited; John Bonham of Led Zeppelin — a band formed in 1968, the year Cream broke up — was slicker. But Mr. Baker brought a new level of artistry to his instrument, and he was the first rock drummer to be prominently featured as a soloist and to become a star in his own right. Mr. Clapton praised him as “a fully formed musician” whose “musical capabilities are the full spectrum.”

Both as a member of the ensemble and as a soloist, Mr. Baker captivated audiences and earned the respect of his fellow percussionists with playing that was, as Neil Peart, the drummer with the band Rush, once said, “extrovert, primal and inventive.” Mr. Baker, Mr. Peart added, “set the bar for what rock drumming could be.”

But Mr. Baker, who got his start in jazz combos and cited the likes of Max Roach and Elvin Jones as influences, bristled when the word “rock” was applied to his playing. “I’m a jazz drummer,” he told the British newspaper The Telegraph in 2013. “You have to swing. There are hardly any rock drummers I know who can do that.”

Mr. Baker’s appearance behind the drum kit — flaming red hair, flailing arms, eyes bulging with enthusiasm or shut tight in concentration — made an indelible impression. So, unfortunately, did his well-publicized drug problems and his volatile personality.

Mr. Baker, who by his own count quit heroin 29 times, was candid about his drug and alcohol abuse in his autobiography, “Hellraiser,” published in Britain in 2009.

He recalled driving from Los Angeles to San Francisco while on tour with the band Blind Faith in 1969 and being more amused than surprised when he heard a report on the radio that he had died from a heroin overdose.

Of a later tour, he wrote, “In 1983-84, I formed the Ginger Baker Trio with guitarist John Simms and bassist Ian Macdonald and we did a tour that included Malta, Spain and Germany; but I can’t remember anything about it due to the fact that I was drinking so heavily.”

He was also, by all accounts, not a very likable man. Journalists who interviewed him tended to find him uncooperative at best, confrontational at worst. The hostility between Mr. Baker and Mr. Bruce, which sometimes led to onstage altercations, was the stuff of rock legend. The 2012 documentary “Beware of Mr. Baker” — the title is taken from a sign outside the house in South Africa where he was living at the time — begins with footage of Mr. Baker physically attacking the film’s director, Jay Bulger.

“If they’ve got a problem with me, come and see me and punch me on the nose,”Mr. Baker says in that film. “I ain’t going to sue you; I’m going to hit you back.”

But if he was difficult to deal with, his talent was impossible to ignore. As A. O. Scott of The New York Times noted in his review of “Beware of Mr. Baker,” Mr. Baker’s music was ultimately “the only reason anyone should take an interest in him.”

Peter Edward Baker — he became known as Ginger during childhood because of his red hair — was born on Aug. 19, 1939, in the Lewisham area of southeast London, to Frederick and Ruby (Bayldon) Baker. His father, a bricklayer, was killed in action during World War II.

Drawn to the drums at an early age, Mr. Baker talked his way into a job with a traditional-jazz combo when he was 16 despite his lack of professional experience. Before long, he was well established on the London jazz scene. He also had a heroin habit that would dog him for decades.

In 1962 Mr. Baker joined Blues Incorporated, one of the earliest British rhythm-and-blues bands, beginning his contentious but musically rewarding association with Mr. Bruce. When the organist and saxophonist Graham Bond left that band in 1964 to form his own group, the Graham Bond Organisation, Mr. Baker and Mr. Bruce went with him.

Two years later they teamed with Mr. Clapton, whose work with the Yardbirds and John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers had made him one of Britain’s most celebrated guitarists, to form Cream.

Performing a repertoire that mixed original compositions with radical reinterpretations of old blues songs, Cream was an instant sensation. Within two years, the band went from nightclubs to stadiums and released four albums, whose total sales were estimated at 35 million. But in 1968, at the height of its success, Cream disbanded.

One reason for the breakup was the continuing animosity between Mr. Baker and Mr. Bruce. Another, Mr. Baker later said, was the extreme volume at which Mr. Clapton and Mr. Bruce played.

“For the first 18 months it was great,” he said in 2013. “But things got too bloody big and too bloody loud. They kept piling these huge Marshall speakers one on top of another. That’s why my hearing’s wrecked.”

Mr. Baker’s next band was, on paper, even bigger than Cream: Blind Faith, in which he and Mr. Clapton joined forces with the singer, keyboardist and guitarist Steve Winwood, known for his work with the Spencer Davis Group and Traffic. (The less famous Ric Grech was the bassist.) Hopes were high, but Blind Faith imploded after one album and one tour, the victim of excessive hype and conflicting egos.

Following the similarly brief life of his next band, Ginger Baker’s Air Force, a jazz-rock outfit with a saxophone section, Mr. Baker led a peripatetic life and stayed largely out of the spotlight.

He spent much of the 1970s in Lagos, Nigeria, where he built a recording studio and became immersed in African music, performing and recording with the singer, songwriter and political activist Fela Kuti. He also developed a love for polo that over the years would prove almost as costly as his drug habit: He drove himself into debt more than once buying and importing polo ponies.

In the ensuing decades he was in and out of various bands, ranging from the hard-rock group Masters of Reality to a jazz trio in which his high-profile sidemen were the guitarist Bill Frisell and the bassist Charlie Haden. He was also in and out of financial trouble and moved frequently, living in England, Italy, Los Angeles and South Africa, where he settled in 1999 and stayed until returning to England in 2012.

Mr. Baker and the other members of Cream were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1993. The band reunited for concerts in London and New York in 2005 and received a Grammy Award for lifetime achievement in 2006.

Whatever hope there might have been for another reunion ended when Jack Bruce died in 2014.

Mr. Baker was married four times. He is survived by his wife, Kudzai Baker, a nurse from Zimbabwe with whom he lived in Kent, England, and three children: Nettie Baker, who has written several books about her relationship with him; Leda Baker, a business analyst; and Kofi Baker, a drummer. All were born in the 1960s during Mr. Baker’s first marriage, to the artist Liz Finch.

In 2013, although he had serious health problems, Mr. Baker toured and recorded with a quartet whimsically named the Ginger Baker Jazz Confusion. Interviewed that year on the BBC television program “Newsnight,” he claimed to have “lost everything six or seven times in my life” and suggested that the motivation for his return to music was more financial than artistic.

“I thought I’d retired,” he said. “Managed to sort of outlive my pension, as it were, so I had to go back to work.”

Asked in that same interview how he would like to be remembered, he paused for a moment and then gave a one-word answer:

“Drummer.”

October 6, 2019. Tags: , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Eddie Money confirms that his 1982 radio and MTV hit “Shakin'” includes one of George Carlin’s seven dirty words

In 1982, Eddie Money had a hit on the radio and MTV with his song “Shakin’.”

Today, most online sources cite one of the song’s lyrics as:

We did some shakin’ ’til the end of the night.

But long before the internet existed, I knew that the words were something else.

And Money recently verified to Rolling Stone magazine what I had known all along. Here’s an excerpt from their recent interview of him. (The bolding is from the original.)

In “Shakin’,” there’s an ostensibly “misheard” lyric where you sing “Her tits were shakin’,” but come on, you were definitely saying that, right?

You know what? Nobody noticed it and [my manager] Bill Graham was so, so pissed off at me because he said that could’ve been a Top Five single, and “you and your sophomoric fucking bullshit, now I can’t get it on the radio.” But when I talked to people, they go, “I loved it when you said that! Wow!”

You didn’t make a clean radio version?

No, there was never a radio version because nobody caught it til the end. Yeah, I said it and I thought it was funny, but in the long run I wish I wouldn’t have said it because that record probably would’ve went double platinum. But I thought it was funny. You know how it is, you know?

To get a song with “tits” in it played on the radio? I don’t.

I was high. I didn’t give a shit. I said it. Who cares?

Here’s the video of the song. Skip to 1:02 for the relevant part:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tcD_dVcXE4

August 29, 2019. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Music. Leave a comment.

Movie trailer for “Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice” – release date September 6, 2019

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDMYAsu5PvI

August 6, 2019. Tags: , , , , . Movies, Music. Leave a comment.

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