I agree with these drivers and police who dragged the protestors out of the street

https://summit.news/2022/12/01/videos-climate-protesters-thrown-around-like-rag-dolls-by-angry-french-motorists/

Videos: Climate ‘Protesters’ Thrown Around Like Rag Dolls By Angry French Motorists

And the police aren’t pissing around with them either

By Steve Watson

December 1, 2022

Everyday French people have had it with climate ‘protesters’ sitting in the road and blocking traffic, as the following footage shows.

Just like in Britain, people trying to drive to work are sick and tired of their daily commute being continually disrupted by people in orange vests crowing about the world ending in 800 days and gluing themselves to the road.

https://twitter.com/CatchUpNetwork/status/1598106691496972288

https://twitter.com/hushsupply_/status/1586395731845210113

https://twitter.com/gchahal/status/1591392916895051780

The ‘protesters,’ reportedly with the group ‘Derniere Renovation’ which translates as ‘Last renovation’ (what?) have been blocking traffic near Paris and in other French cities.

“The only way that we everyday people have left to put pressure on the government is to literally go and sit on the road,” says Victor, 25.

Who are the everyday people? If you have time to sit in the middle of a highway sulking, it ‘aint you mon cheri.

December 1, 2022. Tags: , , . Environmentalism, Idiots blocking traffic, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Alyssa Milano says she traded in her Elon Musk car for a Hitler car because she is against “hate and white supremacy”

“I gave back my Tesla. I bought the VW ev. I love it. I’m not sure how advertisers can buy space on Twitter. Publicly traded company’s products being pushed in alignment with hate and white supremacy doesn’t seem to be a winning business model.”

– Alyssa Milano

Original: https://twitter.com/Alyssa_Milano/status/1596502100066045952

Archive: https://web.archive.org/web/20221126193540/https://twitter.com/Alyssa_Milano/status/1596502100066045952

hitler car

November 30, 2022. Tags: , , , , , , , , , . Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

New York lawyer Urooj Rahman gets only 15 months in prison for firebombing a police car during the George Floyd riots

https://www.yahoo.com/news/lawyer-gets-15-months-behind-193513360.html

Lawyer gets 15 months behind bars for firebombing police car

By Tom Hays

November 18, 2022

NEW YORK (AP) — A New York City attorney was sentenced to 15 months behind bars on Friday for firebombing an empty New York City police vehicle with another lawyer during protests over the murder of George Floyd.

Before hearing her sentence, Urooj Rahman asked a judge to spare her prison time and give her a “second chance” to redeem herself for what she called a momentary lapse of judgement.

“I’m so incredibly sorry for my reckless and wrong actions,” a tearful Rahman said in federal court in Brooklyn. “I don’t think there’s enough words to express my sorrow and regret. … I completely lost my way in the emotion of the night.”

U.S. District Judge Brian Cogan praised her for choosing a career in public interest law to fight against social injustices.

“You’re a remarkable person who did a terrible thing on one night,” Cogan said.

However, Cogan also scolded her for thinking she could get away with violent protest.

“It displays an amazing amount of arrogance. … It’s just a very arrogant way to think,” he said.

Federal prosecutors had recommended a sentence of 18 to 24 months as part of a plea deal.

Rahman and Colinford Mattis were arrested amid clashes between protesters and police on May 30, 2020, during an eruption of demonstrations following Floyd’s killing by a police officer in Minnesota.

Surveillance cameras recorded Rahman hurling an incendiary device into a parked police vehicle, setting fire to its console. No one was injured in the attack, but the vehicle was severely damaged.

Officers arrested the lawyers a short time later and said they found a lighter, a Bud Light beer bottle filled with toilet paper and a gasoline tank in the back of a minivan driven by Mattis, a corporate attorney. Prosecutors alleged the lawyers planned to distribute and throw other Molotov cocktails.

While other lawyers condemned their conduct, some objected to the severity of the charges, arguing that the case was improperly handled as if it were an act of domestic terrorism. When the U.S. attorney in Brooklyn asked that the lawyers be detained without bail, 56 former federal prosecutors sent a legal brief to the court criticizing the government’s handling of the case.

Rahman and Mattis have been disbarred. Mattis is scheduled for sentencing next month.

November 18, 2022. Tags: , , , , , , , . Black lives matter, Racism, Rioting looting and arson, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot complained about food deserts in her city, but she was afraid to point out their cause

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot recently complained about the lack of grocery stores in certain Chicago neighborhoods.

But she was afraid to point out the cause.

I’m not afraid to point it out.

Here are some news articles that were published after the George Floyd riots:

NPR Chicago affiliate WBEZ: “In Chicago’s Poorest Areas, Recovery May Be Long, If It Comes At All”

https://www.wbez.org/stories/in-chicagos-poorest-areas-recovery-may-be-long-if-it-comes-at-all/4ec11642-b45f-4c32-9e48-66ab206d14d5

CBS News: “Chicago’s South Side Left With Few Food Options After Weekend Violence”

https://www.cbsnews.com/chicago/news/chicagos-south-side-left-with-few-food-options-after-weekend-violence/

CBS News: “Black Girls Break Bread Steps In As Looting Leaves Food Deserts Even Worse Off”

https://www.cbsnews.com/chicago/news/black-girls-break-bread-steps-in-as-looting-leaves-food-deserts-even-worse-off/

ABC News: “Chicago residents left scrambling for medications and essentials as looted pharmacies, grocery stores remain closed”

https://abc7chicago.com/looted-pharmacies-destroyed-grocery-stores-looting-stay-at-home-order/6227663/

It’s really a shame that Lightfoot is such a coward.

Just yesterday, I wrote this other blog post about crime in Chicago. It’s called, “The pro-crime, bleeding heart liberals kept releasing violent serial criminal Pherris Harrington, 26, of Chicago, so he could continue to commit more violent crimes. The bleeding heart liberals got exactly what they were hoping for.”

https://danfromsquirrelhill.wordpress.com/2022/11/15/pherris-harrington/

Every city gets exactly as much crime as it’s willing to tolerate.

November 16, 2022. Tags: , , , , , , . Rioting looting and arson, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

According to this Wall St. Journal article, Los Angeles teachers’ unions tried to shut down a South Central charter school that had been very successful at teaching low-income black and Hispanic students

According to this Wall St. Journal article, Los Angeles teachers’ unions tried to shut down a South Central charter school that had been very successful at teaching low-income black and Hispanic students.

In my opinion, successful schools should not be shut down.

Instead, they should be copied.

Every child should be allowed to attend a school as good as this one.

The fact that the teachers’ unions tried to shut down this successful school, instead of copying it, is despicable.

This is the complete article from the Wall St. Journal:

https://web.archive.org/web/20081014175429/http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122394095677630803.html

Charter Success in L.A.

School choice in South Central.

October 14, 2008

With economic issues sucking up so much political oxygen this year, K-12 education hasn’t received the attention it deserves from either Presidential candidate. The good news is that school reformers at the local level continue to push forward.

This month the Inner City Education Foundation (ICEF), a charter school network in Los Angeles, announced plans to expand the number of public charter schools in the city’s South Central section, which includes some of the most crime-ridden neighborhoods in the country. Over the next four years, the number of ICEF charters will grow to 35 from 13. Eventually, the schools will enroll one in four students in the community, including more than half of the high school students.

The demand for more educational choice in predominantly minority South Los Angeles is pronounced. The waitlist for existing ICEF schools has at times exceeded 6,000 kids. And no wonder. Like KIPP, Green Dot and other charter school networks that aren’t constrained by union rules on staffing and curriculum, ICEF has an excellent track record, particularly with black and Hispanic students. In reading and math tests, ICEF charters regularly outperform surrounding traditional public schools as well as other Los Angeles public schools.

ICEF has been operating since 1994, and its flagship school has now graduated two classes, with 100% of the students accepted to college. By contrast, a state study released in July reported that one in three students in the L.A. public school system — including 42% of black students — quits before graduating, a number that has grown by 80% in the past five years.

Despite this success, powerful unions like the California Teachers Association and its political backers continue to oppose school choice for disadvantaged families. Last year, Democratic state lawmakers, led by Assembly Speaker Fabian Núñez, tried to force Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to sign a bill that would have made opening a new charter school in the state next to impossible. Mr. Nunez backed down after loud protests from parents in poorer neighborhoods.

School reformers in New York, Ohio, Florida, Connecticut, Utah and Arizona have faced similar challenges of late. Last year in Texas, where 81% of charter school students are minorities (versus 60% in traditional public schools), nearly 17,000 students had to be placed on charter waiting lists. Texas is currently bumping up against an arbitrary cap on the number of charters that can open in the state. Unless the cap is lifted by state lawmakers, thousands of low-income Texas children will remain stuck in ineffective schools.

Back in California, ICEF says that its ultimate goal is to produce 2,000 college graduates each year, in hopes that the graduates eventually will return to these underserved communities and help create a sustainable middle class. Given that fewer than 10% of high-school freshmen in South Los Angeles currently go on to receive a college diploma, this is a huge challenge. Resistance from charter school opponents won’t make it any easier.

November 16, 2022. Tags: , , , , , , , . Dumbing down, Education, Social justice warriors, Unions. Leave a comment.

The pro-crime, bleeding heart liberals kept releasing violent serial criminal Pherris Harrington, 26, of Chicago, so he could continue to commit more violent crimes. The bleeding heart liberals got exactly what they were hoping for.

By Daniel Alman (aka Dan from Squirrel Hill)

November 15, 2022

Pherris Harrington, 26, is a violent serial criminal from Chicago.

Harrington was convicted of armed robbery. But the bleeding heart liberals decided to let him out on parole so he could commit more violent crimes.

Even though his parole forbade Harrington from leaving Illinois, he went to Branford, Connecticut, where, on October 25, 2022, he committed armed robbery at a gas station.

Even though this was at least Harrington’s second armed robbery (I’m guessing there have probably been others, given his age), and even though he violated his parole, the bleeding heart liberals still insisted that it would be wrong to lock him up.

So, on November 13, 2022, in Chicago, Harrington did exactly what the bleeding heart liberals were hoping he would do.

He committed a carjacking.

He kidnapped a baby that was in the car’s back seat.

He crashed the stolen car into several vehicles.

He assaulted a paramedic.

He assaulted a police officer.

In other words, Harrington did exactly what the bleeding heart liberals wanted him to do when they repeatedly refused to keep him locked up.

Sources:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/chicago-man-allegedly-carjacked-vehicle-161833033.html

https://patch.com/connecticut/branford/police-interrupt-gas-station-robbery-progress-chicago-man-charged

November 15, 2022. Tags: , , , . Social justice warriors, Violent crime. Leave a comment.

In Charlotte, North Carolina, Mecklenburg County Judge Tracy Hewett reduced the bond for serial rapist Octavis Wilson from from $2 million to $50,000, and said, “We’re gonna help you out.”

In Charlotte, North Carolina, Mecklenburg County Judge Tracy Hewett reduced the bond for serial rapist Octavis Wilson from from $2 million to $50,000, and said, “We’re gonna help you out.”

The serial rapist said, “I will not mess up no more. You have my word. I will stay out of trouble.”

Judge Hewett is either pro-rape, or a gullible idiot.

Either way, she never should have been allowed to be a judge.

Sources:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/north-carolina-police-chief-slams-212939359.html

https://www.wbtv.com/2022/11/10/were-going-help-you-out-with-that-judge-reduces-bond-suspect-sexual-assault/

https://www.wcnc.com/article/news/crime/mecklenburg-county-judge-bond-reduced-significantly-for-charlotte-rape-suspect/275-057136f0-82c0-4acc-b755-0eadc584045d

November 14, 2022. Tags: , , , , , , , , , . Social justice warriors, Violent crime. 3 comments.

Why did Honda make an anti-marriage commercial?

Honda is in the business of selling cars.

So why did they make this anti-marriage commercial?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUEnhpRQErQ

 

November 14, 2022. Tags: , , , , . Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Student debt bailout, the ant, and the grasshopper: The party that supported slavery wants to force low income taxpayers to pay for vacations and restaurant meals for people with college degrees

By Daniel Alman (aka Dan from Squirrel Hill)

November 14, 2022

In Aesop’s classic fable, “The Ant and the Grasshopper,” the ant spends all summer saving up food for the winter, while the grasshopper does not. When winter comes, the ant is well fed, and the grasshopper starves to death.

When I was a child in the 1970s, this fable was taught to children, in order to teach us a lesson. We were taught that the ant was the good guy, and the grasshopper was the bad guy.

Today’s Democrats who favor student debt bailout have a different interpretation of this fable. They view the ant as the bad guy because he was greedy and selfish, and he didn’t help the grasshopper. And they view the grasshopper as an innocent victim who deserves a bailout.

For the record, Aesop was a slave.

CNBC recently reported the following about the proposed student debt bailout:

“While recipients won’t see that aid in the form of a check, any remaining balances will be re-amortized, meaning monthly payments will be recalculated to reflect the new balance. For borrowers, that means monthly payments could drop by up to $300 per month.”

“73% of anticipated recipients say they expect to spend their debt forgiveness on non-essential items, including travel, dining out and new tech, according to a recent survey from Intelligent.com.”

It’s no surprise to me that the party that supported slavery wants to force low income taxpayers to pay for vacations and restaurant meals for people with college degrees.

November 14, 2022. Tags: , , , . Social justice warriors, Student debt bailout. Leave a comment.

Democrats said it was a hate crime when someone set a black church on fire in Mississippi. But the suspect who got arrested is black.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/mississippi-police-arrest-suspect-church-arson-democrat-called-tactic-suppress-votes

Mississippi police arrest suspect in church arson that Democrat called ‘tactic to suppress’ votes

The Mississippi Democrat Congressional candidate said that the incident ‘invoke[d] historical acts of terrorism’

By Adam Sabes

November 11, 2022

Mississippi church fire suspect

The Hinds County Sheriff’s Office says Delvin McLaurin was arrested Tuesday in Terry, Mississippi following a tip from the public. (Hinds County Sheriff’s Office)

Police in Mississippi arrested a 23-year-old old suspect thought to be associated with seven fires across Jackson, with two of them being at churches, in what one Democrat Congressional candidate called an attempt to suppress votes.

Among the two churches set on fire, one of them was destroyed in the fire. All the fires took place around Jackson early Tuesday morning.

Shuwaski Young, a former candidate for Mississippi’s 3rd Congressional District, said that the fire was an attempt to suppress votes in the area and said it invokes acts of terrorism. 

“This morning several churches were burned in Jackson, Mississippi on Election Day. These cowardly actions invoke historical acts of terrorism when people are fighting for their right to vote and live peacefully as Americans and Missisippians,” Young said. “We will not be deterred and will not be intimidated. We will not allow domestic terrorists to suppress our right to vote. I ask all Mississippians to GO VOTE regardless of this decades old intimidation tactic to suppress our votes today. Just Go VOTE.”

https://twitter.com/shuwaskiyoung/status/1589979730081906690

Beginning on Tuesday at around 2:45 a.m., officials received calls regarding six fires around the city. By 6 a.m., six of the seven fires were put out by firefighters.

Epiphany Lutheran Church, a predominantly Black church in Jackson, was among the churches burnt and was on fire for over four hours.

At Jackson State University, a historically Black school, a fire began in the area surrounding the baseball practice field.

The Hinds County Sheriff’s Office said that Devin McLaurin was arrested in relation to the arson incidents, but didn’t add what his motivation was.

McLaurin is being charged with felony malicious mischief, and is also being questioned by the Federal Bureau of Investigations.

Patrick Armon, assistant fire chief with the Jackson Fire Department said that this is unusual for the area.

“I’ve been here for 30 years. This is a major occurrence,” Armon said. “This is not something we normally go to. We have about a third of our department on sites.”

Lloyd Caston, 73, who is an elder at Epiphany Lutheran Church, said that she woke up to a call at around 4 a.m. stating that the church was on fire.

When Caston arrived to the church, he saw that it was “fully enflamed.” He said that he “was hurt” when he saw the church on fire.

“It destroyed the church and everything in it,” Caston said.

Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba said that no polling locations were impacted by the fires.

“We don’t yet know who or why, but I want to thank the firefighters because they were able to respond to that and still get back to the stations, so that people could set up for voting precincts,” Lumumba said.

Fox News has reached out to Young.

November 11, 2022. Tags: , , , , , , , . Fake hate crimes, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Charlotte, North Carolina keeps letting this serial rapist out of jail, so he can keep raping again and again

https://www.yahoo.com/news/north-carolina-police-chief-slams-212939359.html

North Carolina police chief slams judge for reducing repeat violent offender’s bond from $2M to $50K

By Audrey Conklin

November 9, 2022

Johnny Jennings, the police chief of Charlotte, North Carolina, on Wednesday criticized an unnamed judge’s decision to reduce a repeat violent offender’s bond from $2 million to $50,000.

Octavis Wilson, 29, is facing charges of first-degree kidnapping, second-degree forcible rape, assault on a female, sexual battery, assault with a deadly weapon and other charges.

“We were pleased and appreciative of the original decision by the Mecklenburg County Magistrate’s Office to issue a $2 million bond for Octavis Wilson, a violent repeat offender. However, a judge decided just days later to lower this individual’s bond to a mere $50k,” Jennings said in a Wednesday tweet. “The CMPD takes violent offenses against our community members extremely serious and as we continue to utilize every resource possible to hold those offenders accountable.”

Wilson is most recently accused of striking up a conversation with a woman who was walking in northwest Charlotte before “brutally” attacking and sexually assaulting her, police announced on Nov. 5.

The offender has a lengthy history of prior charges. Most recently, he was charged with assault with a deadly weapon and attempted first-degree forcible rape on Sept. 16. He was released less than a month later on Oct. 5, according to Mecklenburg County.

In April, Wilson was charged with assault to inflict serious injury and released in June. Last year, authorities charged the 29-year-old with attempted first-degree forcible rape and assault with a deadly weapon for a Sept. 13, 2021, incident before he was released on Sept. 30, 2021.

Prior to that, authorities charged Wilson with assault on a female, communicating threats and larceny for a Feb. 9, 2021, incident before releasing him on Feb. 22, 2021.

“What kind of message are we sending to our citizens when they see these offenders get right back out after committing very serious crimes against them?” Jennings asked. “Our job is to do everything in our power to not only keep the community safe but to make them feel safe.”

The police chief continued, “We continue to ask our judicial partners to take these crimes just as serious as we do. There’s no bond amount that is sufficient for a community’s peace of mind regarding their safety.”

While Republicans flipped the North Carolina Supreme Court, Mecklenburg County on Tuesday voted overwhelmingly for a Democratic district attorney and Democratic district judges — many of whom ran unopposed. Democrats also won all nine seats on the Mecklenburg County Board of Commissioners, according to the Charlotte Observer.

November 10, 2022. Tags: , , , , . Social justice warriors, Violent crime. Leave a comment.

Footage shows moment Insulate Britain protester was pushed by wheels of car

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gAiWVq-HKwM

Video description:

Guardian News

Footage shows moment Insulate Britain protester was pushed by wheels of car

October 19, 2021

Footage has emerged of the moment an Insulate Britain protester was pushed by a Range Rover by a woman driving her son to school.

When the protesters refuse to move the driver gets back into her car and inches it forward on to them.

Asked if she was hurt, during the incident which took place last Wednesday during the group’s protest on the A1090 in Thurrock, Essex, one activist said: “I think so, but I feel quite a lot of adrenalin pumping.”

The video was shared by Insulate Britain. A spokesperson for the group said this was the first time they had published any footage of the reactions they have provoked.

October 22, 2022. Tags: , , , . Environmentalism, Idiots blocking traffic, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Video and transcript: Derrick Wilburn, a black father, criticizes critical race theory at a school board meeting in Falcon, Colorado

https://www.foxnews.com/us/black-father-slams-crt-colorado-school-board-meeting-video

https://dailycitizen.focusonthefamily.com/colorado-school-board-bans-critical-race-theory-after-black-fathers-impassioned-speech/

https://thebluestateconservative.com/2022/10/20/epic-black-dad-unloads-on-woke-school-board-over-crt-gets-standing-ovation-from-room-video/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnJNujTKdVA

I’d like to begin my comments tonight by reading a quote, which in essence is the genesis of all of this Black Lives Matter, social justice CRT conversations we’re having in our country today, quote, I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color, close quote, Colin Kaepernick, August 2016.

I am the direct descendant of the North American slave trade. Both of my parents are black, all four of my grandparents are black, all eight of my great great grandparents all 16 of my great greats. On my mother’s side, my ancestors were enslaved in Alabama. On my father’s side, we were enslaved in Texas.

I am not oppressed. I’m not oppressed, and I’m not a victim. I’m neither a press nor a victim. I travel all across this country of ours. And I check into hotels and I fly commercially. And I walk into retail establishments, and I order food and restaurants. I go wherever I want, whenever I want. I am treated with kindness, dignity, and respect, literally from coast to coast. I have three children. They are not oppressed either.

Although they are victims, I’ve taught my children, they’re victims of three things, their own ignorance, their own laziness and their own poor decision making. That is all my children. We are not victims of America, we are not victims of some unseen 190 year old force that kind of floats around in the ether.

Putting critical race theory into our classrooms is taking our nation in the wrong direction. racism in America would by and large, be dead today, if it were not for certain people and institutions keeping it on life support. And sadly, sadly, very sadly, one of those institutions is the American education system.

I can think of nothing more damaging to a society than to tell a baby born today that she has grievances against another baby born today, simply because of what their ancestors may have done two centuries ago. There is simply no point in doing that to our children. And putting critical race theory into our classrooms, in part does that putting critical race theory into our classrooms is not combating racism.

It’s fanning the flames of what little embers are left. I encourage you to support this resolution. Let racism die the death it deserves.

October 20, 2022. Tags: , , , , , . Education, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

An athlete says she was “targeted and racially heckled throughout the entirety of the match,” but the video and audio recordings say otherwise. The New York Times says fake claims like this are so common that a black writer wrote a book about them.

https://web.archive.org/web/20221014203005/https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/14/opinion/racism-byu-volleyball.html

What a Report of Extreme Racism Teaches Us

By John McWhorter

October 14, 2022

It’s time for a few words on what we might learn from a Black volleyball player’s claims about what happened at a match she participated in at Brigham Young University this past August. I have refrained from commenting on this for a spell, in case there were further revelations. As there have been none yet, I shall proceed.

Rachel Richardson, a Black member of Duke’s volleyball team playing in a match at Brigham Young University, claimed that she and other Black teammates were “targeted and racially heckled throughout the entirety of the match,” such that they had to face a crowd amid which slurs “grew into threats.”

But a sporting match such as this one is attended by thousands and is well recorded, both professionally and also by anyone in attendance with a cellphone. To date, no one has offered evidence that corroborates Richardson’s claims of racist verbal abuse, either independently or as part of an investigation by B.Y.U. There is nothing comparable in the security footage or in the television feed the school took of the match. No one at the match representing either school has described hearing such a thing happening. No witnesses have been reported as coming forward.

To be clear: It is possible that some racist spectator shouted a racial slur at Richardson at some point during the match. But it seems apparent that no rising tide of slurs and threats occurred during that match — that would be clear in the recordings. And Richardson’s having possibly exaggerated what happened casts into doubt whether there were any slurs at all, given that people leveling such words tend to do so with the intention of being heard by others, and no one present has come forward and explicitly said they heard it. Richardson and her representatives have presented no explanation as to why recordings via modern technology do not reveal what she claimed.

We cannot know why Richardson made this claim. Maybe she misheard common volleyball chants, as some have suggested. Or perhaps there were members of the crowd who did in fact resort to racist slurs that others either did not hear or are not willing to corroborate. But it’s hard not to sense that all of this is discomfitingly ambiguous — the likelihood that Richardson’s basic claim of being continuously heckled with racist slurs from the stands seems rather infinitesimal.

But this is why the B.Y.U. story is important. The message from this story is not just that interpretations of events will differ, or that in some fashion racism persists in America even if the details on this case are murky. We must also engage with the unfortunate possibility that the B.Y.U. story may be a demonstration of a pattern, one that we must be aware of to have an honest debate about racism in America today.

I have long noticed, in attending to episodes of this kind in our times, that claims of especially stark and unfiltered racist abuse, of the kind that sound like something from another time, often do not turn out to have been true. Accounts of this kind, I have realized, should be received warily. Not with utter resistance, but with a grain of salt.

The people making such claims appear to be thinking of horrors of the past and claiming that what supposedly happened to them shows that those horrors persist. It is difficult not to notice, for example, the parallel between Richardson’s claim and Jackie Robinson’s being called the N-word from the stands in the 1940s.

But while we have not remotely reached a point where racism does not exist, we have reached a point where some people are able to fabricate episodes of racism out of one unfortunate facet of being not Black, but human — crying wolf and seeking attention. This kind of thing was probably less likely when actual episodes of this kind, including lethal ones, were ordinary. Who would, on top of legalized segregation and lynching, make up racist violence? It would have seemed too trivializing of what actual people regularly went through. But today? Things are, while imperfect, quite different.

The classic, and perhaps officially inauguratory, example — and this is in no way to equate Richardson’s possible exaggeration to the prior, extraordinary event — was Tawana Brawley’s claim in 1987 to have been kidnapped and raped by a group of white men and then left in the woods wrapped in a garbage bag, covered with feces and scrawled with racial slurs. The sheer luridness of that scenario was always a clue that Brawley staged the whole thing, which she was proved to have done. A U.S. Justice Department report concluded that in Ferguson, Mo., in 2014, Officer Darren Wilson did not callously shoot Michael Brown dead despite his having his hands up in surrender, despite Brown’s friend Dorian Johnson’s claim to that effect.

White lacrosse players at Duke did not rape a Black stripper at a party, despite the 88 Duke professors who published a newspaper ad implying the lacrosse players were guilty. And of course, the actor Jussie Smollett’s story that MAGA-hatted homophobic racists jumped him in the wee small hours and put a noose around his neck has not held water. Nor is it an accident that the scenario sounds less like real life than something that would have happened on the television soap opera “Empire” that Smollett was starring in.

Cases like these are not eccentric one-offs. It is painful to have to write that they are a pattern. The incidents could fill a whole book, and they have: “Hate Crime Hoax” by Wilfred Reilly, a Black political scientist, covers over 400 cases primarily in the 2010s that were either disproved or shown to be highly unlikely. It isn’t that discrimination never happens. But the more extreme and ghastly the story, the less likely I am to believe it.

It is a kind of good news. Today’s hoaxes are often based on claims of the kinds of things that actually happened to people and went unpunished in the past. That today such things are sometimes fabricated shows, oddly, that in real life, progress has taken place.

My point is not remotely to ignore claims of racism. It is to be wary of the especially bizarre, antique-sounding cases. And so: Indeed, the racially offensive trash talk by the Los Angeles City Council members that surfaced this week was egregious, but talk like that, when speakers are unaware anyone else will hear, is common, sad though that is. That story does not disprove my point, because it happened in an ordinary rather than outlandish manner. Grotesque, racist private talk certainly still persists.

While we must always be maximally aware that racism does still exist, we must also know that not all claims of racist abuse hold water and that being aware of this does not disqualify one from being an antiracist. True antiracists know that Black people exhibit the full scale of human traits and tendencies, including telling tall tales — and yes, even about matters involving racism.

October 14, 2022. Tags: , , . Fake hate crimes, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

California convicted rapist arrested for murder just weeks after early release from life sentence: ‘senseless’

https://www.yahoo.com/news/california-convicted-rapist-arrested-murder-204409780.html

California convicted rapist arrested for murder just weeks after early release from life sentence: ‘senseless’

By Lawrence Richard and Danielle Wallace

October 12, 2022

A convicted rapist in California whose sentencing judge argued he should “never get out of prison” was arrested in the murder of a Sacramento man just weeks after his release, officials said.

Michael Xavier Bell, 36, was arrested this past Sunday for murdering a 60-year-old Sacramento care facility employee just 73 days after he was released early from a decades-long sentence, according to the Association of Los Angeles Deputy District Attorneys.

Association President Michele Hanisee called his early release “tragically predictable” and said it resulted in “another senseless murder of an innocent victim.”

Bell’s release came amid the state’s effort to rehabilitate juvenile offenders not guilty of homicide back into society under Senate Bill 1391. The legislation passed and was signed into law in 2019 by then-Governor Jerry Brown.

Attorney General Rob Bonta and other California state officials “ignored impassioned pleas about how dangerous this legislation was to public safety,” Hanisee argued.

“There were no safeguards created within this legislation to protect the public from the most dangerous juvenile offenders such as Bell,” the associated president added. “Nor was there any mechanism for addressing the retroactive effect on convicted juveniles, like Bell, who had since become adults and who therefore could not be returned to the jurisdiction of the juvenile justice system.”

“This is why Bell was released from custody without any form of supervision or services and apparently without having received any type of sex offender treatment or rehabilitation,” Hanisee also said.

Nathan Hochman, a Republican running for California Attorney General, reacted in a statement to Fox News Digital

“Tragically, but as predicted, Attorney General Rob Bonta’s support for a bill that allowed Michael Xavier Bell, a convicted, brutal rapist, to be released decades early from his sentence only to arrested 73 days later for murdering a 60-year old Sacramento man, proves how unfit Bonta is to be our chief law enforcement officer,” Hochman said. “As a result of Bonta’s actions, the victim’s blood is on Bonta’s hands.”

Bell was initially arrested in December 2000 after breaking into a woman’s home and sexually assaulting and raping her at gunpoint, according to court documents.

“Bell and an accomplice took turns committing sexual assaults, at times pointing a gun at the victim’s head and at times pointing the gun at the victim’s 8-year-old son, forcing him to watch,” Hanisee said.

At the time of the incident, Bell was nine days away from his 15th birthday. His age did not stop a state court from trying and convicting him as an adult in 2002 — a decision SB 1391 revisited.

“He was so dangerous and unrepentant that the sentencing judge stated: ‘It is this court’s intention this defendant never, never get out of prison. This defendant is incapable of being rehabilitated. This defendant is not someone who should ever be allowed into society,’” Hanisee wrote.

Bell was subsequently sentenced to a combined state prison term of 53 years to life behind bars for multiple counts of robbery, multiple counts of forcible rape, multiple counts of forcible oral copulation, kidnapping and assault with a firearm. After a lengthy legal battle, the sentence was reduced to 43 years to life.

This sentence was reaffirmed in Sept. 2016 when the case was appealed. Then-California Attorney General Kamala Harris represented the state in arguing to keep his lengthy sentence in place.

Court documents show Christopher Hawthorne, an attorney for Bell, countered by arguing that the “parole eligibility date at age 55 violates the equal protection and cruel and unusual punishment provisions of the state and federal Constitutions.”

The 2nd District Court of Appeal disagreed and affirmed the initial judgment.

The Association claimed Bell remained unrepentant through his time in prison and had a violent in-prison record.

“According to records filed with the court, he was twice convicted of new felony battery cases while in prison and had numerous disciplinary write-ups wherever he was housed. In his last years of incarceration, he was charged and convicted of felony vandalism of government property for smashing the windows of the visiting area. He was even written up for the rape of another inmate,” Hanisee said.

Despite the violent pattern, California officials ultimately chose to release him.

Fox News Digital reached out to Bonta’s office but did not immediately receive a response.

October 13, 2022. Tags: , , . Social justice warriors, Violent crime. Leave a comment.

Vancouver, Canada refuses to protect the public from a violent serial criminal who has more than 30 convictions

https://www.yahoo.com/news/career-criminal-struck-asian-student-182906631.html

Career criminal who struck Asian student with a pole in Vancouver walks free after bail

By Carl Samson

October 12, 2022

The man accused of violently attacking a 19-year-old Asian woman in downtown Vancouver late last month is now out of jail after being granted bail.

Mohammed Majidpour, 35, allegedly struck the victim’s head with a pole while she was walking near Dunsmuir and Cambie Streets at around 9:50 a.m. on Sept. 27. He also allegedly yelled anti-Asian slurs before fleeing the scene.

A Canada-wide manhunt commenced after Majidpour was identified. He was reportedly arrested the following day.

Majidpour has been charged with assault with a weapon in connection with the incident. Records show he has had over 30 convictions dating back to August 2015, which include cases of assault, assault with a weapon and making threats, as per Global News.

Just last year, Majidpour was charged with criminal harassment after allegedly stalking a woman named Jamie Coutts in the city’s Chinatown area. However, after pleading guilty to unrelated counts, his charge was stayed and he was only given a year of probation.

Still, Majidpour reportedly violated his probation multiple times before the Sept. 27 attack. Aside from his assault charge, he appeared in Downtown Community Court for failure to report.

Majidpour, however, walks free once again after the judge granted him bail and released him on several conditions this week. Those conditions include avoiding contact with the victim, avoiding possession of any weapon and reporting to a bail supervisor and certain support workers.

Kash Heed, former Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General of British Columbia, voiced his disappointment at the decision. He believes Majidpour will re-offend.

“If you want to look at a frustrating failure of our justice system in British Columbia and how it’s administered, this is a prime case,” Heed told CTV News. “The unfortunate part is someone else will become a victim of his violent nature, and that’s a sad part of this.”

Majidpour is set to return to court on Nov. 15.

October 12, 2022. Tags: , , . Social justice warriors, Violent crime. Leave a comment.

Op-Ed: Listen up, college students. You don’t ‘get’ a grade. You have to earn it

https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2022-10-09/college-rating-professor-jones-petition-students

Op-Ed: Listen up, college students. You don’t ‘get’ a grade. You have to earn it

By Jillian Horton

October 9, 2022

Every fall, my mental timeline is flooded with memories of the teachers who changed my life. And last week — when I read about the controversial termination of Maitland Jones Jr., a distinguished New York University professor whose courses in organic chemistry were deemed too hard by students hoping to get into medicine — it took me back to the September I met my toughest teacher.

It was 1994, and I was a 19-year-old student in my third year at Western University in London, Ontario. I had signed up for a course in the department of English taught by one Donald S. Hair. My first clue that professor Hair would defy expectations? He was bald.

Standing at the lectern in a three-piece suit, he took roll, ever-so-properly referring to each of us as “Miss” or “Mister.” It was a distinct shift from the vaguely beatnik tone of many of our other professors, with whom students could sometimes be found drinking beer at one of the campus pubs.

A few weeks into the class, the professor administered our first test. I didn’t think I had anything to worry about — until he handed my exam back the following week with a 67 written on it in red ink.

Sixty-seven! I’d never received such a low mark. I was dependent on a scholarship, and any grade below 80 put my future in jeopardy. My seatmate’s murderous expression revealed her mark had been miserable too. We fumed silently: Professor Hair was an old weirdo! How dare he derail our GPAs? What was the old boy’s problem, anyway?

But the real problem was this: He was right. I knew it as soon as I’d cooled off and taken the time to digest his comments. My writing was sloppy, my understanding of key concepts superficial. Like many of my peers, I was used to earning top grades. Now, for the first time, a teacher had introduced an uncomfortable question. Were we actually “earning” them?

The next day, I went to his office. With burning cheeks, I told him I knew I’d butchered the exam. To my childish surprise, he wasn’t a “weirdo” in the least. He was funny, warm and uncommonly patient. He assured me if I worked hard, I’d achieve my potential in the course, and he’d be available to help me.

I went away, read and read some more. The more I read, the more interesting his classes became, and soon, his complex, spellbinding lectures were the highlight of my week. I worked my guts out in that course. The grade I earned in his class was the lowest I’d receive that year. But I had earned that grade. Nearly 30 years later, I’m still proud of that.

As an associate dean and teacher of medical students for the last 20 years, I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about what usually makes a good doctor — and it isn’t organic chemistry. I disagree with the colleague of professor Jones who told the New York Times that he did not want anyone treating patients who did not “appreciate transformations at the molecular level.” The comment struck me as slightly less outdated than keeping a bag of leeches for emergency bloodletting. There is ample evidence other paths prepare students extremely well for a career in medicine.

That issue is a sideshow anyway, because the strong public reaction to this story is largely about something else: the commodification of education. For U.S. medical schools, the Assn. of American Medical Colleges oversees a rigorous and detailed accreditation process, which relies on the collection of mounds of data — including an exit survey that can heavily influence the school’s accreditation outcome. The survey begins by asking students to rate the degree to which they agree or disagree with this statement: “Overall, I am satisfied with the quality of my medical education.”

Is that the right way to ask someone to evaluate their education? It seems more appropriate for rating their Starbucks latte. My job is not to ensure my children — or my students — are always “satisfied.” That metric would worsen the quality of my parenting and my teaching; both require me to do unpopular things if I am to do my job well. “Satisfaction” is the language of consumer experience, and when it becomes a target metric, it alters something fundamental about the interaction between people.

I have felt that shift as an educator. I’ve witnessed, and championed, long-overdue changes in the learning environment, including a focus on the psychological safety of students. But I’ve seen disheartening changes too — namely the evolution of a relationship with students that sometimes feels transactional, as if the primary objective is no longer just about turning them into doctors but, rather, keeping them constantly satisfied, the teacher less preceptor than proprietor.

That shift is deeply, deeply unsatisfying.

Long after I’d moved on from Western University, I heard professor Hair had been nominated for an award for excellence in teaching. “Professors are often afraid to employ his high standards,” I eagerly wrote in a two-page letter of support. “Setting the bar higher may initially be uncomfortable, but it gives students … a sense of self-respect and pride which is stolen from us when we work in circumstances where such experiences do not exist.” He won that award. And he also earned it.

If my low grade in professor Hair’s class had been a barrier to me becoming a doctor, would I feel differently? I really don’t know. I suppose I thought he had a right to be tough as long as he was also trying to be fair. The irony? What I learned from him made me a better doctor. Not because I was satisfied.

Because I grew.

Jillian Horton is a writer and physician. She is the author of “We Are All Perfectly Fine: A Memoir of Love, Medicine and Healing.”

October 9, 2022. Tags: , , , , , . Dumbing down, Education, Health care, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

New York City let this guy keep trying until he finally succeeded at killing someone

https://www.yahoo.com/news/homeless-man-accused-fatal-brooklyn-234100661.html

Homeless man accused of fatal Brooklyn subway slash was free without bail in earlier stabbing

By John Annese

October 6, 2022

The homeless man accused of fatally slashing a union steamfitter aboard a Brooklyn L train was free without bail after a 2021 knife attack in Brooklyn.

Alvin Charles, 43, was arrested in July 2021 and charged with attempted first-degree assault, accused of stabbing a man in the arm and stomach that April. Prosecutors asked for $50,000 bail, but Judge Jessica Earle-Gargen granted him supervised release.

Law enforcement sources said he was complying with the terms of his release and showing up at his court appearances, so when a grand jury indicted him on attempted murder charges in March, Supreme Court Judge Matthew Sciarrino continued his supervised release.

Charles is accused of getting into an argument with victim Tommy Bailey, 43, on a Canarsie-bound L train at around 8:50 p.m. Friday. He stabbed and slashed Bailey repeatedly in the head, neck and torso, killing him, according to a criminal complaint.

The stabbing was caught on video, and the NYPD used facial recognition software to identify Charles, the complaint alleges. Several people also witnessed the attack, according to cops, though the witnesses aren’t mentioned in the complaint.

Charles’ lawyer, Roy Wasserman of the Legal Aid Society, said he’s heard of no other evidence beyond the facial recognition hit that established Charles as the killer — software that “has been found by experts and other jurisdictions to be racially biased against darker-skinned people.”

“It says on police paperwork that I’ve observed before that it can be used in terms of investigation but it cannot be used for probable cause,” she said. “It seems that he became a suspect based on racially biased software that the NYPD uses. I haven’t heard otherwise.”

Wasserman tried, unsuccessfully, to have Charles released, arguing that New York state law doesn’t allow the judge to consider “dangerousness” when setting bail, and that his history complying with the court dates in his pending case proves he’s not a flight risk.

Judge Inga O’Neale nevertheless ordered Charles held without bail, based on the seriousness of the murder charge he faces.

October 8, 2022. Tags: , , , . Social justice warriors, Violent crime. Leave a comment.

Every city has exactly as much crime as it’s willing to tolerate

https://www.yahoo.com/news/14-old-bronx-gunman-busted-223600961.html

14-year-old Bronx gunman busted for attempted murder has 18 prior arrests

By Rocco Parascandola and Thomas Tracy

October 7, 2022

He’s 14 with more arrests than years around the sun — and now he’s facing two attempted murder charges, police said Friday.

The fresh-faced teen, who now has 18 arrests under his belt, was busted on Oct. 5 for two recent shootings in the Bronx, including one in which the target was shot in the leg, NYPD Chief of Detectives James Essig said.

The youth opened fire on his victims from the back of the scooter, Essig said.

“Eighteen (arrests)… He’s 14-years-old,” Essig lamented Friday.

The teen was not identified because of his age. The driver of the scooter remained at large.

Essig said Bronx investigators linked the boy to a Sept. 19 shooting in which someone opened fire on a Dunkin’ Donuts on Broadway near W. 230th St. in Marble Hill. The gunman was aiming at a man inside the eatery. He caused property damage, but didn’t injure anyone, cops said.

He was also allegedly connected to a Sept. 25 shooting on Kingbridge Road near Webb Ave. in Kingsbridge Heights where a man was shot in the leg.

Police believe the teen is responsible for another Bronx shooting on Sept. 22, this one less than a block from the first crime, in which another man was hit in the leg. The teen hasn’t been charged in that case.

Cops charged the teen with two counts of attempted murder and weapons possession. He was arraigned in Bronx Criminal Court.

Police say the teen is a Young Gunna, a gang affiliated with the Bloods. All three of the victims are members of Old Kingsbridge Block 1300, known as the OKBs, a subset of the Crips.

The boy’s first time in a holding cell was in 2018 — when he was about 10 or 11 — for menacing someone with a weapon, police said.

His arrest record includes multiple misdemeanor and felony assaults, gang assault, criminal mischief, menacing, possession of a loaded firearm and criminal possession of stolen property after he was found with a stolen motorcycle, cops said.

Earlier this year, cops arrested him on grand larceny charges, authorities said.

October 8, 2022. Tags: , , , . Parenting, Social justice warriors, Violent crime. Leave a comment.

New York University dumbs down its pre-med curriculum so students who are too dumb and/or lazy to pass organic chemistry can still become doctors

https://web.archive.org/web/20221004011409/https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/03/us/nyu-organic-chemistry-petition.html

At N.Y.U., Students Were Failing Organic Chemistry. Who Was to Blame?

Maitland Jones Jr., a respected professor, defended his standards. But students started a petition, and the university dismissed him.

By Stephanie Saul

October 3, 2022

In the field of organic chemistry, Maitland Jones Jr. has a storied reputation. He taught the subject for decades, first at Princeton and then at New York University, and wrote an influential textbook. He received awards for his teaching, as well as recognition as one of N.Y.U.’s coolest professors.

But last spring, as the campus emerged from pandemic restrictions, 82 of his 350 students signed a petition against him.

Students said the high-stakes course – notorious for ending many a dream of medical school – was too hard, blaming Dr. Jones for their poor test scores.

The professor defended his standards. But just before the start of the fall semester, university deans terminated Dr. Jones’s contract.

The officials also had tried to placate the students by offering to review their grades and allowing them to withdraw from the class retroactively. The chemistry department’s chairman, Mark E. Tuckerman, said the unusual offer to withdraw was a “one-time exception granted to students by the dean of the college.”

Marc A. Walters, director of undergraduate studies in the chemistry department, summed up the situation in an email to Dr. Jones, before his firing.

He said the plan would “extend a gentle but firm hand to the students and those who pay the tuition bills,” an apparent reference to parents.

The university’s handling of the petition provoked equal and opposite reactions from both the chemistry faculty, who protested the decisions, and pro-Jones students, who sent glowing letters of endorsement.

“The deans are obviously going for some bottom line, and they want happy students who are saying great things about the university so more people apply and the U.S. News rankings keep going higher,” said Paramjit Arora, a chemistry professor who has worked closely with Dr. Jones.

In short, this one unhappy chemistry class could be a case study of the pressures on higher education as it tries to handle its Gen-Z student body. Should universities ease pressure on students, many of whom are still coping with the pandemic’s effects on their mental health and schooling? How should universities respond to the increasing number of complaints by students against professors? Do students have too much power over contract faculty members, who do not have the protections of tenure?

And how hard should organic chemistry be anyway?

Dr. Jones, 84, is known for changing the way the subject is taught. In addition to writing the 1,300-page textbook “Organic Chemistry,” now in its fifth edition, he pioneered a new method of instruction that relied less on rote memorization and more on problem solving.

After retiring from Princeton in 2007, he taught organic chemistry at N.Y.U. on a series of yearly contracts. About a decade ago, he said in an interview, he noticed a loss of focus among the students, even as more of them enrolled in his class, hoping to pursue medical careers.

“Students were misreading exam questions at an astonishing rate,” he wrote in a grievance to the university, protesting his termination. Grades fell even as he reduced the difficulty of his exams.

The problem was exacerbated by the pandemic, he said. “In the last two years, they fell off a cliff,” he wrote. “We now see single digit scores and even zeros.”

After several years of Covid learning loss, the students not only didn’t study, they didn’t seem to know how to study, Dr. Jones said.

To ease pandemic stress, Dr. Jones and two other professors taped 52 organic chemistry lectures. Dr. Jones said that he personally paid more than $5,000 for the videos and that they are still used by the university.

That was not enough. In 2020, some 30 students out of 475 filed a petition asking for more help, said Dr. Arora, who taught that class with Dr. Jones. “They were really struggling,” he explained. “They didn’t have good internet coverage at home. All sorts of things.”

The professors assuaged the students in an online town-hall meeting, Dr. Arora said.

Many students were having other problems. Kent Kirshenbaum, another chemistry professor at N.Y.U., said he discovered cheating during online tests.

When he pushed students’ grades down, noting the egregious misconduct, he said they protested that “they were not given grades that would allow them to get into medical school.”

By spring 2022, the university was returning with fewer Covid restrictions, but the anxiety continued and students seemed disengaged.

“They weren’t coming to class, that’s for sure, because I can count the house,” Dr. Jones said in an interview. “They weren’t watching the videos, and they weren’t able to answer the questions.”

Students could choose between two sections, one focused on problem solving, the other on traditional lectures. Students in both sections shared problems on a GroupMe chat and began venting about the class. Those texts kick-started the petition, submitted in May.

“We are very concerned about our scores, and find that they are not an accurate reflection of the time and effort put into this class,” the petition said.

The students criticized Dr. Jones’s decision to reduce the number of midterm exams from three to two, flattening their chances to compensate for low grades. They said that he had tried to conceal course averages, did not offer extra credit and removed Zoom access to his lectures, even though some students had Covid. And, they said, he had a “condescending and demanding” tone.

“We urge you to realize,” the petition said, “that a class with such a high percentage of withdrawals and low grades has failed to make students’ learning and well-being a priority and reflects poorly on the chemistry department as well as the institution as a whole.”

Dr. Jones said in an interview that he reduced the number of exams because the university scheduled the first test date after six classes, which was too soon.

On the accusation that he concealed course averages, Dr. Jones said that they were impossible to provide because 25 percent of the grade relied on lab scores and a final lab test, but that students were otherwise aware of their grades.

As for Zoom access, he said the technology in the lecture hall made it impossible to record his white board problems.

Zacharia Benslimane, a teaching assistant in the problem-solving section of the course, defended Dr. Jones in an email to university officials.

“I think this petition was written more out of unhappiness with exam scores than an actual feeling of being treated unfairly,” wrote Mr. Benslimane, now a Ph.D. student at Harvard. “I have noticed that many of the students who consistently complained about the class did not use the resources we afforded to them.”

Ryan Xue, who took the course, said he found Dr. Jones both likable and inspiring.

“This is a big lecture course, and it also has the reputation of being a weed-out class,” said Mr. Xue, who has transferred and is now a junior at Brown. “So there are people who will not get the best grades. Some of the comments might have been very heavily influenced by what grade students have gotten.”

Other students, though, seemed shellshocked from the experience. In interviews, several of them said that Dr. Jones was keen to help students who asked questions, but that he could also be sarcastic and downbeat about the class’s poor performance.

After the second midterm for which the average hovered around 30 percent, they said that many feared for their futures. One student was hyperventilating.

But students also described being surprised that Dr. Jones was fired, a measure the petition did not request and students did not think was possible.

The entire controversy seems to illustrate a sea change in teaching, from an era when professors set the bar and expected the class to meet it, to the current more supportive, student-centered approach.

Dr. Jones “learned to teach during a time when the goal was to teach at a very high and rigorous level,” Dr. Arora said. “We hope that students will see that putting them through that rigor is doing them good.”

James W. Canary, chairman of the department until about a year ago, said he admired Dr. Jones’s course content and pedagogy, but felt that his communication with students was skeletal and sometimes perceived as harsh.

“He hasn’t changed his style or methods in a good many years,” Dr. Canary said. “The students have changed, though, and they were asking for and expecting more support from the faculty when they’re struggling.”

N.Y.U. is evaluating so-called stumble courses — those in which a higher percentage of students get D’s and F’s, said John Beckman, a spokesman for the university.

“Organic chemistry has historically been one of those courses,” Mr. Beckman said. “Do these courses really need to be punitive in order to be rigorous?”

Dr. Kirshenbaum said he worried about any effort to reduce the course’s demands, noting that most students in organic chemistry want to become doctors.

“Unless you appreciate these transformations at the molecular level,” he said, “I don’t think you can be a good physician, and I don’t want you treating patients.”

In August, Dr. Jones received a short note from Gregory Gabadadze, dean for science, terminating his contract. Dr. Jones’s performance, he wrote, “did not rise to the standards we require from our teaching faculty.”

Dr. Gabadadze declined to be interviewed. But Mr. Beckman defended the decision, saying that Dr. Jones had been the target of multiple student complaints about his “dismissiveness, unresponsiveness, condescension and opacity about grading.”

Dr. Jones’s course evaluations, he added, “were by far the worst, not only among members of the chemistry department, but among all the university’s undergraduate science courses.”

Professors in the chemistry department have pushed back. In a letter to Dr. Gabadadze and other deans, they wrote that they worried about setting “a precedent, completely lacking in due process, that could undermine faculty freedoms and correspondingly enfeeble proven pedagogic practices.”

Nathaniel J. Traaseth, one of about 20 chemistry professors, mostly tenured, who signed the letter, said the university’s actions may deter rigorous instruction, especially given the growing tendency of students to file petitions.

“Now the faculty who are not tenured are looking at this case and thinking, ‘Wow, what if this happens to me and they don’t renew my contract?’” he said.

Dr. Jones agrees.

“I don’t want my job back,” he said, adding that he had planned to retire soon anyway. “I just want to make sure this doesn’t happen to anyone else.”

October 7, 2022. Tags: , , , , , , , , . Dumbing down, Education, Health care, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Texas Wesleyan Cancels Play After Students Say Use of Slur Is Harmful [The writer of the play is black]

https://web.archive.org/web/20221006141216/https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/06/us/texas-wesleyan-play-racism.html

Texas Wesleyan Cancels Play After Students Say Use of Slur Is Harmful

The play’s author, who is Black, said he crafted its language to be historically accurate in representing civil rights struggles. But the theater program at the university heeded the call of students.

By April Rubin

October 6, 2022

Texas Wesleyan University halted its production of “Down In Mississippi,” a play about registering voters in the 1960s, after criticism from students who said racist epithets in the script could contribute to a hostile, unwelcoming environment. Its author said he was using that language to represent the reality of the period.

The play by Carlyle Brown, a Black playwright based in Minneapolis, focuses on the efforts of a movement that led to passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which outlawed racial discrimination and protected Black voters. The plot, which is set during the Freedom Summer campaign, centers on three student activists as they travel from New York City to the South to register Black voters.

In telling that story, the playwright included a scene in which a white character used a racial slur, repeatedly, to refer to Black people, opening up a controversy on campus that also spotlighted a larger rift in American society over discussions of race and the portrayal of the struggles of people of color in media and the arts.

Two students who were not part of the production, and were described as a Latinx woman and a Black woman, heard about the scene through word of mouth and submitted bias reports to the university’s administration on Sept. 23, said Chatashia Brown, the university’s assistant director for student diversity and inclusion programs.

Their complaints prompted administrators of the university, in Fort Worth, to host a “listening session” on Sept. 29, which had been previously scheduled as the opening night of the play. Students, actors and members of the university’s faculty and staff joined the open forum, as did Mr. Brown.

Black students said that the explicit language in the play would further aggravate problems on a campus that they said did not cater to the needs of its significant population of students of color. As of fall 2021, 58 percent of students at Texas Wesleyan identified as Asian, Black, Latino or biracial.

“They wanted to kind of come in and be able to see the story and understand its impact without being triggered by it,” Ms. Brown said.

The students who expressed their concerns said that the repetition of the racial slur, spoken about a dozen times in the play, would have caught them off guard and negatively affected their mental health. They worried that the play could lead other students who are not Black to feel more comfortable repeating the slur.

“We pretty much all understand what harmful language is and how it’s been used because a lot of them still deal with that today,” Ms. Brown said. “So they just thought the timing and the place of it was pretty upsetting.”

The playwright said that his intentions were for the performance to be historically accurate. To him, the past shouldn’t be sanitized — and he said that the racial slur was used provocatively, for audience members to feel the impact it has had in real life. The scene portrays one of the play’s three students, who is white, showing the Black student how he would be treated on their journey. Training sessions like the one portrayed were common at the time and were intended to help people understand the severity of the behavior they could face.

Mr. Brown, who joined the listening session on a video call, said the play seems to have become a catalyst for a discussion about racial relations on campus that is separate from his work

“As the conversation went on, a couple students went up and looked at my image on the screen and said, ‘It’s not your play, Mr. Brown; it’s just not the play at this place, at this time,’” he said in an interview.

Last school year, the president of the Black Student Association went on a hunger strike to raise awareness of the lack of diversity on Texas Wesleyan’s campus. Among the sources of her discontent: The university didn’t have substantial classes focused on ethnic or racial studies, despite having a diverse student body; and no established multicultural center existed for students to convene.

The protest, along with other feedback from students about concerns with the campus climate and diversity, prompted the university to announce earlier this year that it would emphasize “community, engagement and inclusion” through a strategic plan, which included measures such as incorporating multiculturalism, inclusion and anti-intolerance in its curriculum; engaging in culturally relevant teaching to connect with students of diverse backgrounds; and identifying a space on campus for multicultural student programs.

However, the discussions around the play showed that students’ grievances had not been addressed to the extent they wanted, said Jaylon Leonard, president of the student body.

“It was not the play itself, but about some things that we had dealt with in the past with the school in regard to diversity and inclusion recently that weren’t unanswered,” he said, adding that “for this to be thrown on top of those issues, it was something that we were not ready to accept.”

Production dates for “Down in Mississippi” were first delayed, and the theater program considered hosting the play off campus at the Jubilee Theatre, a Fort Worth venue that puts on plays that highlight African American experiences. But the faculty of the Texas Wesleyan theater department decided not to put on the play at all, after students involved expressed their discomfort, said Joe Brown, theater chair and professor of theater arts.

The theater program has produced plays about the Holocaust, the gay rights movement, religion and political extremism, and they have been well-regarded in the campus community, Professor Brown said. All of the upcoming plays this season will examine the theme of exclusion.

“Our motivation was what’s happening in the United States right now is pretty scary with women’s rights and L.G.B.T.Q. rights and voter suppression and Black rights,” he said. “There’s some scary things happening in different states, so we felt the timeliness of ‘Is history repeating itself?’”

Students in the play sought the guidance of D. Wambui Richardson, the artistic director of the Jubilee Theatre, early in the production process, since he has put on several other plays with similar themes. He has heard the critique that the approach of a play could be glorifying negative aspects of the Black experience, citing an act on police brutality as an example, Mr. Richardson said.

“Our response was if we’re not creating a space for the conversations to be had in a safe and nurturing environment, then those conversations are not being had,” he said.

He offered for the production of “Down In Mississippi” to be moved to his theater, but Mr. Richardson came to understand that the Fort Worth student community did not seem ready for it.

“A message is only as important and vital as the lips that will repeat it, the ears that will hear it and the legs that will carry it,” Mr. Richardson said.

As the only Black person on the production team, Mya Cockrell, who was responsible for the scenic design, had reservations but felt that she had to come to terms with a show that was moving forward.

She appreciated that members of the cast went out and spoke with people involved in the civil rights movement and learned about the history, but she said that the greater campus community would have benefited from that discussion.

“I personally don’t think that the theater was in a place to put on a show like this,” Ms. Cockrell said, “because I think there’s a lot more that we can do as a community to help people, and I don’t think we were necessarily doing that or educating people outside of the theater.”

October 7, 2022. Tags: , , , , , , , , , . Cancel culture, Dumbing down, Education, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

NYC bail reform slammed after repeat offender makes 42nd attack

https://www.yahoo.com/news/nyc-bail-reform-slammed-repeat-084310114.html

NYC bail reform slammed after repeat offender makes 42nd attack

By Bryan Ke

October 4, 2022

Robert Kelley, vice president of New York City’s Transport Union, slammed the city’s bail reform on national television following a repeat offender’s attack on a “hero” subway employee nearly two months ago.

Kelley criticized the city’s bail reform during his appearance on “Fox & Friends First” on Monday, more than a month after Alexander Wright, 49, was accused of assaulting an off-duty subway worker in the Bronx in August.

“This has to stop. The new bail reform must be changed. Time and time again, this guy shouldn’t have even been privileged to be under the new bail reform in terms of him being free,” Kelley told host Todd Piro.

“After 40 beatings, you’d think they’d lock him up and throw away the key,” he continued.

The subway incident occurred at Pelham Bay Park Station on Aug. 11 when the victim, identified as Anthony Nelson, 35, was called by a rider to help two straphangers Wright was harassing. Nelson, who was off-duty at the time, rushed to help the victims.

After Nelson arrived at the scene to get a description of the harasser for the police, Wright reportedly punched him in the face as he walked away. The subway employee suffered a dislocated nose and a broken collarbone from the attack.

Despite being injured, he and another man held Wright down until the authorities arrived. Wright was charged with assault and harassment. Last week, he was arraigned and is currently being held at Rikers Island on a $5,000 bail.

Before the August incident, Wright already had over 40 prior arrests on record, including an attack on an Asian woman in New York City’s Chinatown in May 2021.

“I never thought I’d say this, but, at the end of the day, the MTA employees have a more dangerous job than the NYPD,” Kelley said. “At least they [the NYPD] have weapons to protect themselves… our members don’t.”

October 5, 2022. Tags: , , . Social justice warriors, Violent crime. Leave a comment.

Laura L. Morgan in the Wall St. Journal: ‘Implicit Bias’ Training Cost Me My Job – States are forcing medical professionals to make false confessions of racism. I refused to go along.

https://archive.ph/LuVpq

‘Implicit Bias’ Training Cost Me My Nursing Job

States are forcing medical professionals to make false confessions of racism. I refused to go along.

By Laura L. Morgan

September 30, 2022

I was fired from my nursing job this year for refusing to take “implicit bias” training. After 39 years of providing equal care to all my patients without regard to their race, I objected to a mandatory course grounded in the idea that I’m racist because I’m white. I fear every healthcare professional will soon be forced to make the same awful decision I did: Falsely admit to being racist or abandon the medical field.

My ordeal started in September 2021 when my employer, Dallas-based Baylor Scott & White Health, rolled out its annual training modules for clinical educators. The list included “Overcoming Unconscious Bias.” After viewing the interactive course, I contacted my supervisor and asked for a meeting with the chief nursing officer and the human resources director. The former sent a surrogate; the latter didn’t attend. After two meetings, it was clear that I wouldn’t be given an exemption. My supervisor told me, “I don’t want you to die on this cross.”

But I did. The idea of implicit bias is grounded in the belief that white people treat those who aren’t white worse than those who are. It’s part of the woke assumption that society, including healthcare, suffers from “systemic racism.” Accordingly, my own supposed implicit bias, which is a euphemism for ingrained racism, must be rooted out. Not only that, it must be replaced with preferential treatment for the nonwhite. I fail to see how real racial discrimination is justified by my nonexistent racism.

I knew it was coming, but I was still devastated when I was fired in February. I went from a six-figure job to zero income. The day I was fired I sold my car to make sure I’d have enough money to live on. When I tried to find a new healthcare job, no one would hire me. No doubt if they contacted my old employer, they were told why I was let go.

States are increasingly requiring implicit-bias training as a condition for obtaining medical and nursing licenses. As of July, the Kentucky Board of Nursing requires that all registered nurses take a continuing-education course on implicit bias. In July, as a journalistic exercise, I paid $5 and signed up for the recommended course, created by the Kentucky Nurses Association. Nurses are told that “implicit bias kills,” and that white privilege is a “covert” form of racism. The course walks nurses through their possible contributions to “modern-day lynchings in the workplace.”

In June, Michigan started requiring all professional-license holders to take two hours of implicit-bias training. That’s everyone from doctors and nurses to dentists and counselors. The training must be taken at every license renewal, which sends the message that racism is essentially permanent and incurable. Massachusetts also mandated implicit-bias training for doctors in June, connecting doctors’ supposed racism to lower-quality care for minority patients. Maryland will enact its rule for “all healthcare practitioners” on Oct. 1.

No state board of medicine or nursing provides sufficient evidence to support the claim that all white people are implicitly biased, and there’s plenty of scholarly research that shows that implicit-bias testing is flawed. Policy makers don’t seem to be considering the unintended consequences of these mandates. Accusing my peers and me of racism will contribute to soaring levels of burnout, causing many to leave the medical profession. Some, like me, will surely be forced out. Patients, especially minorities, will experience the most harm. Their caregivers are being told to admit to unconscious racism. Why would you see a physician who supposedly hates you and will hurt your health?

More state mandates are surely on the way, including in red states. Most state medical associations, which exert a powerful influence over policy, have bought in to the belief that their own members are racist. The Texas Nurses Association declares the existence of “racial biases in healthcare” and supports implicit-bias training for nurses. The national Federation of State Medical Boards urges state boards to take a bigger role in addressing the “systemic racism and structural inequities” that it says are “embedded” in American healthcare.

Before I was fired, I wrote the following to the leadership of Baylor Scott & White Health: “Treating patients, coworkers, family members, and my superiors in a fair and respectful manner is the practice I have subscribed to during my entire 39-year nursing career.” The same is true of most of the medical professionals I’ve worked with. No one – not me, my peers or our patients – will be better off if more states call us liars and racists.

September 30, 2022. Tags: , , , , , , . Health care, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Urooj Rahman, the BLM supporting lawyer who bombed an empty police car in New York City, claims that the real victim is herself

https://freebeacon.com/courts/firebombing-attorney-begs-for-light-sentence-citing-inebriation-and-unprocessed-trauma/

Firebombing Attorney Begs for Light Sentence, Citing Inebriation and ‘Unprocessed Trauma’

Urooj Rahman was ‘quite drunk’ during George Floyd riots, court filings show

By Josh Christenson

September 29, 2022

A left-wing lawyer who pleaded guilty to firebombing a police cruiser is asking for a commutation of her sentence, pointing to the fact that she was inebriated at the time of the offense and coping with “unprocessed trauma,” according to court filings.

Attorneys for Urooj Rahman argue the self-described human-rights activist was “numb, disassociated, and inebriated” when she threw a Molotov cocktail into a New York City police car during the George Floyd riots in May 2020. Lawyers say Rahman was also reeling from her many “abusive partnership relationships” and processing “early trauma” from being taunted as a Muslim after 9/11.

On the night of May 29, 2020, Rahman “became quite drunk” after drinking vodka on “an empty stomach” with fellow lawyer and later getaway driver Colinford Mattis. Rahman’s attorneys say the pair’s decision to firebomb an NYPD cruiser was an “aberrational” act meant to protect others from future police violence.

“Tossing the Molotov cocktail was a way of expressing anger at those police officers around the country for whom Black lives did not matter,” Rahman’s attorneys wrote in a September memo to U.S. District Judge Brian Cogan. “It was an act of protest intended to avoid exposing others to harm.”

Rahman’s attorneys have requested she be released on “time served,” saying “her conduct that night was a marked deviation from her otherwise exemplary life.”

The request for a special dispensation builds on a sweetheart deal already reached by Justice Department prosecutors in the case. In June, Rahman and Mattis entered into a second plea agreement that broke their potential 10-year sentences down to a maximum of 5 years. Prosecutors want Judge Cogan to go even lower, arguing for just 18 to 24 months based on the “history and personal characteristics of the defendants.”

Rahman and Mattis each confessed to counts of conspiracy to commit arson and to making and possessing an unregistered destructive device, dodging a previous domestic terrorism sentencing enhancement. The two had pleaded guilty in October 2021 to one count of possessing or making a destructive device, which could have earned them each 10 years in prison.

Since their arrest, Rahman and Mattis have won the sympathy of national media and liberal elites. New York magazine, NPR, and other outlets have run favorable profiles of the two. Rahman has remained under house arrest with electronic monitoring since June 2020, when a former Obama administration intelligence official helped post her $250,000 bail.

Their defenders have said the Trump administration wished to make a political example of the pair, bringing federal charges for a crime that is usually dealt with by local authorities. Rahman’s attorneys in their memo argue the defendant has received harsher treatment compared with another federal case involving an NYPD van firebombed in July 2020. Rahman’s attorneys also say their client’s “commitment to social justice” should earn her a more lenient sentence.

But prosecutors who first took up the case emphasized Rahman and Mattis had a higher obligation to uphold the rule of law. The two “abdicated their responsibilities as attorneys” when they chose to not only throw but make and distribute the Molotov cocktails. A witness testified that Rahman passed the explosives out earlier to rioters. Prosecutors also revealed text messages between Rahman and Mattis showing they planned the attack.

“Bring it to their neck,” Mattis texted Rahman before sharing the location of police headquarters. “Molotovs rollin’,” Rahman responded. “I hope they burn everything down. Need to burn all police stations down and probably the courts too.”

Rahman also gave a video interview before distributing the explosives. “This shit won’t ever stop unless we fuckin’ take it all down,” she said. “The only way they hear us is through violence.”

Rahman and Mattis say they have each been diagnosed with anxiety and depression, for which they have received psychiatric care. Both have also been treated for alcoholism.

A clinical psychologist who analyzed Rahman at the behest of her attorneys said the defendant “[b]eneath her surface functionality is gravely compromised.” Rahman, she says, has two therapists, regularly attends meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous, and is prescribed an array of psychiatric medications.

A graduate of Fordham University’s law school, Rahman was a public interest lawyer with Bronx Legal Services. Mattis, a graduate of Princeton and New York University Law School, was an associate at Pryor Cashman, a midsize corporate law firm.

Rahman was due at a sentencing in a Brooklyn federal court on Thursday but successfully petitioned for the hearing to be moved to November 9.

September 29, 2022. Tags: , , , , , . Black lives matter, Rioting looting and arson, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Why does New York City keep releasing this violent serial criminal from jail again and again and again?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NmLObXISeKg

https://abc7ny.com/woman-beaten-in-subway-station-waheed-foster-assault-howard-beach/12268543/

Woman savagely beaten in Queens subway station describes the pain, trauma

September 26, 2022

HOWARD BEACH, Queens (WABC) — Police have arrested a man in a brutal assault inside a Queens subway station that was caught on surveillance video.

It happened around 5:15 a.m. on Tuesday, September 20, at the Howard Beach-JFK Airport station.

Authorities say a 33-year-old woman was approached by a man who tried to start a conversation and then followed her into the mezzanine.

When the woman did not respond and ignored the advances, police say the man dragged her across the floor of the mezzanine and slammed her into the wall, where he repeatedly pounded her with his fists and kicked her about the face and body.

One passerby tried to intervene but retreated onto the platform when the man advanced towards him.

The attacker then kicked and punched the woman several more times before fleeing the scene.

Police responded and arrested the suspect.

The victim, who appears to be a security guard, was transported to Jamaica Hospital where she was treated for a serious but non-life threatening eye injury.

“Do you know how scared I am now? I was never a person to be scared,” victim Elizabeth Gomes said.

She said her head throbs with pain, and she’s barely slept in a week since the attack.

“I can’t see anything on my right side, honestly. And it just hurts,” Gomes said.

She says the suspect was muttering incoherently about “Satan” in the moments before the attack.

“He’s talking about the devil. He’s talking about a whole bunch of nonsense,” Gomes said.

Gomes’ husband is heartbroken and furious.

“Man, I watched the video, and it tears my heart out of me,” Clement Tucker said.

The suspect, 41-year-old Waheed Foster, is now charged with felony assault.

In 1995, law enforcement sources say Foster was arrested for murdering his 82-year-old foster grandmother in a brutal beating at the age of 14. Six years later, he was arrested for stabbing his 21-year-old sister with a screwdriver. Then in 2010, he was arrested for attacking three workers at the Creedmore Psychiatric Center, where he was an inpatient. He was on parole until November 2024 at the time of last week’s attack.

Gomes says there were no police officers anywhere in the station. She said there was no one to prevent the attack and no one on the scene to respond to it.

“Every day is an incident in the subway,” she said. “What happened to all these police officer they said they will have there to protect us? There’s like nobody to be found. I don’t understand.”

September 27, 2022. Tags: , , , . Social justice warriors, Violent crime. Leave a comment.

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