Here are some predictions from the first Earth Day in 1970

The following predictions were made during the first Earth Day in 1970:

* Denis Hayes, the chief organizer for the first Earth Day, wrote, “It is already too late to avoid mass starvation.”

* Senator Gaylord Nelson, the founder of Earth Day, stated, “Dr. S. Dillon Ripley, secretary of the Smithsonian Institute, believes that in 25 years, somewhere between 75 and 80 percent of all the species of living animals will be extinct.”

* Peter Gunter, a professor at North Texas State University, stated, “… by 1975 widespread famines will begin in India; these will spread by 1990 to include all of India, Pakistan, China and the Near East, Africa. By the year 2000, or conceivably sooner, South and Central America will exist under famine conditions… By the year 2000, thirty years from now, the entire world, with the exception of Western Europe, North America, and Australia, will be in famine.”

* Paul Ehrlich, author of The Population Bomb, predicted that between 1980 and 1989, 4 billion people, including 65 million Americans, would starve to death.

* Life Magazine wrote, “… by 1985 air pollution will have reduced the amount of sunlight reaching earth by one half.”

* Ecologist Kenneth Watt stated, “The world has been chilling sharply for about twenty years. If present trends continue, the world will be about four degrees colder for the global mean temperature in 1990, but eleven degrees colder in the year 2000. This is about twice what it would take to put us into an ice age.”

* Watt also stated, “By the year 2000, if present trends continue, we will be using up crude oil at such a rate…that there won’t be any more crude oil.”

January 17, 2016. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Environmentalism, Overpopulation, Politics, Science. 1 comment.

South Africa’s communist redistribution of farmland has been a colossal failure

In their 1848 publication Manifesto of the Communist Party, Karl Marx and Frederick Engels wrote:

“The theory of the Communists may be summed up in the single sentence: Abolition of private property.”

In 2009, the people of South Africa elected communist Jacob Zuma to be their new President.
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January 3, 2013. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , . Communism. Leave a comment.

Frank Dikotter, author of “Mao’s Great Famine: The History of China’s Most Devastating Catastrophe,” talks about China’s collectivization of farmland

This video  is a real life horror tale of famine, torture, murder, and other unimaginable, real world brutalities that happened after Mao collectivized the farmland, housing, tools, food, and other property in China.  The author explains that without private ownership, there was no incentive to grow food, housing literally disappeared, everyone became a thief, and people sold their own children for a handful of grain.
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October 19, 2012. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Politics. Leave a comment.

The world’s supply of resources is getting bigger, not smaller

According to the laws of physics, the total quantity of mass and energy is fixed. Therefore, we cannot “create” new mass or energy, and we cannot “use up” the mass and energy that we already have.

But there is something else that we can do – we can invent, build, and use technology to increase our standard of living. For example, petroleum was worthless until someone with a brain invented a way to use it, at which point the petroleum became a valuable resource. Likewise, today we take rocks that used to be worthless, and turn them into computer chips that are worth trillions of dollars.
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July 5, 2012. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Economics, Environmentalism, Overpopulation, Politics, Science, Technology. 11 comments.

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