What’s Cooking in Switzerland: Burt Wolf Travels & Traditions (#805)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KLKRDAsNj0

October 23, 2022. Tags: , , , , , , . Food, Television, travel. Leave a comment.

False advertising! Dole’s “100% juice” is not 100% juice. Dole deliberately adds insects to it.

Dole sells a product called, “Dole 100% Juice Orange Strawberry Banana.”

At least, that’s what is says on the front of the package.

However, on the back of the package, they admit that their claim of “100% juice” is a scam. A lie. A con. A fraud.

The back of the packaging says it includes something called “cochineal extract.”

Cochineal extract = insects.

Therefore, Dole’s claim that this product is “100% Juice” is a lie.

Shame on Dole!

September 9, 2022. Tags: , , , , . Food. Leave a comment.

An alternative to debt forgiveness: This writer says eating peanut butter and jelly for lunch instead of going to a restaurant made them feel happy and in control of their life.

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/m-18k-debt-went-no-143039541.html

I’m $18k in debt, so I went on a no-spend month. Here’s what I learned.

By Chegg Life

August 31, 2022

Standing in my kitchen on a recent morning, making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich for lunch later that day, it occurred to me that what would appear to be a fairly mundane (albeit delicious) task was actually so much more.

Maybe that’s because, during the previous month, I spent close to $700 on restaurants alone. That’s like a million peanut butter and jellies.

It was that revelation that inspired a month-long no-restaurants-or-shopping challenge I assigned to myself in July. I could not continue to ignore my mounting bills, and I could not go on living with the constant reminder and anxiety of my $18,000 of credit card debt.

Since getting laid off in March 2021, I’ve been funding my life on a freelance salary in one of the most expensive cities in the world. I was living beyond my means, swiftly approaching my credit limit, and I felt completely out of control. Something had to change. And fast.

I was lucky to have a supportive (and much more knowledgeable friend) in my corner. We (she) quickly went on the offensive and introduced me to Tiller, a budgeting software she uses. She showed me how to calculate my expenses for the past three months and make a budget for the long term. Fun, I thought, but begrudgingly obliged. It was like watching a scary movie. But much like seeing Scream 5 in theaters after years of convincing myself I would be too scared, confronting my spending head-on made me realize that, like the Scream franchise, this isn’t that scary at all.

Looking at my expenses, I made the difficult-to-me decision to cut restaurants and shopping out completely for a full month. No shopping for non-necessities. No takeout. No dinners out with friends. No “Let’s grab a drink!” Could I actually do it? It was an off-putting prospect for a person who has been known to refresh Resy in hopes of scoring a last-minute, hard-to-get reservation for sport. But it felt worth trying.

Along with my shopping and food restrictions and newfound budgeting habit, I knew I needed to take action to feel like I was getting things a bit more in control; it was abundantly clear during this deep dive into my credit card statements that I was not in control at all. So, I began to make a few painful decisions, canceling a laundry list of plans that I simply could not afford: a dinner plan that very evening, a trip to Seattle later in the month to celebrate a friend’s wedding. I even called a beloved bathing suit brand to cancel an order I’d placed just days earlier. As I mentally crossed out things I’d been eagerly anticipating, I returned to a saying someone shared with me that I’ve found applicable in so many situations:

Just because something feels bad doesn’t mean it’s wrong.

I expected some change as a result — like, perhaps, a little extra literal change in my account at the end of the month. And that certainly happened. But there were so many other unexpected lessons, too.

I felt so much gratitude

When I first took shopping and restaurants out of the equation, I worried about how I’d fare without the dopamine hit that comes only from clicking “buy now” or the excitement of that initial sip of an overpriced cocktail — would I feel like I was missing out?

That notion was tested a few times during the month. I went to a concert at a baseball stadium (tickets purchased pre-challenge) mid month, where, under normal circumstances, I would have typically bought, at the very least, chicken fingers and french fries and merch and, at the most, all of the above plus a $20 beer in a souvenir cup.

But I packed a sandwich and some wine in a thermos and tried to put fried food out of my mind. In line with a friend who wanted to get a drink, I felt the temptation creeping in. I’m not sure if it was the concert or the spending gods, but as we approached the front of the line, a very generous (and intoxicated) man turned around, announced he’d be buying drinks for everyone in the line and pulled out his credit card.

With the exception of the gifted tequila, I was mostly surprised to find myself not feeling deprived.  I actually more grateful for not only the things I already have but for the people in my life that make it so special and sweet. Every time I shared my challenge with someone and they suggested going for a walk or having a picnic, it felt like my heart swelled three sizes.

I got more creative

That same friend who first sat me down in front of the computer to face my spending demons also helped me realize something that never occurred to me in all my life living in New York where your social life revolves around paying other people to cook for you. Meeting for dinner is so…easy.

Removing it as an option would mean getting more creative, finding more fun. I went on walks, on picnics, to the beach and to see free movies in the park that we always talk about seeing in the summer but never do. I snuck grocery store snacks into the movies. I went to Philadelphia to visit friends who planned an entire weekend of free or affordable activities — a pizza night and a bike ride. Another friend decided to host a potluck for her birthday dinner instead of going out. I found myself looking forward to finding new activities to do that didn’t involve spending money, and looking even more forward to checking my bank account and keeping tabs on my budget each day.

Who is she? I could barely recognize myself.

I tried my hand at new cuisines

Aside from the ubiquitous PB&J, I found myself trying out new recipes, like this miso-glazed salmon and a kale Caesar salad I cannot stop making. And, as an unexpected bonus, I feel… really good. It may not be sustainable to make myself every meal for the rest of forever, but having a basic idea of everything I was consuming for a month really made me feel like I was taking care of myself.

I connected with so many people

When I reached out to friends I’d made plans to spend the weekend with prior to starting this challenge, I was plagued with anxiety about how they would react. I wrote to them explaining what was going on and assured them that they were still welcome to go out to eat, that I would meet up with them when they were done. But they were more than happy to stay in and cook. Trying new restaurants is always exciting, but when it comes down to it, we make plans with people to connect and spend quality time together. And you don’t need to spend money to do that.

I started posting daily video diaries on my TikTok, mostly as a way of holding myself accountable and to keep a record of the experience. But soon, it grew into a community. I heard from so many different people who were either at some point in their debt payoff journey or looking for some inspo. I was happy to share both.

And I realized that, when given the chance, everyone has a debt story they’re eager to share.

I was initially scared to share publicly the actual amount of credit card debt I had. I was afraid of my mom seeing it, my family members on Facebook judging me. I was afraid of being made fun of, ridiculed for not knowing how to handle my money. What happened was quite the opposite.

I was on a walk with my friend (the one who helped me with the budget) one morning, agonizing over my finances when I just sort of…blurted it out, I told her I had $18,000 in debt — saying that number aloud for the first time. I waited for the shock, the disapproval. Bless her, it never came.

Once it was out there, my DMs almost immediately filled up with other people going through a similar situation, some offering tips on how to crawl out of it, some sharing personal anecdotes and even some comforting solidarity. It was not only refreshing; it was eye-opening, too. It made me realize that talking about finances openly and without judgment is something many of us are craving, and not necessarily getting.

I’m not sure what comes next. But as this month comes to an end, I have spent over $2,000 less than the month prior. I paid $1,000 off my credit card balance, put money away for taxes, and felt no anxiety about what my balance was while handing my debit card over to pay for some essentials. I didn’t get sick of peanut butter and jelly, and I have yet to miss a restaurant.

Mostly, I’m excited about the prospect of finally being in control of my finances — and my life — for what feels like the first time.

August 31, 2022. Tags: , , , , , . Economics, Food. 1 comment.

Chickens are self replicating. A hen lays approximately 5 eggs per week. Therefore, the communists who control Cuba would have to be especially incompetent to create a shortage of chickens.

This CNN video is from 2019. It was filmed  in Cuba. It shows a large number of people waiting in line, for many hours, all based on the hope that there might, maybe, possibly be one chicken available for them when they finally get to the front of the line. Maybe they’ll get a chicken that day. Maybe not.

Even if they do manage to get a chicken after waiting in line for many hours, the opportunity cost of waiting in line for such a long amount of time is enormous. Imagine all of the things that all of those people could be doing with all of that time if they were living in a country that wasn’t Cuba.

Chickens are self replicating. A hen lays approximately 5 eggs per week.

Therefore, the communists who control Cuba would have to be especially incompetent to create a shortage of chickens.

Skip to 3:09

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1OETmSugh8

July 23, 2022. Tags: , , , . Communism, Food. Leave a comment.

Hamburger vending machine

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wf6aa-TwHRE

March 27, 2022. Tags: , . Food, Technology. Leave a comment.

The ‘Fittest Woman on Earth’ shared the diet she eats to lose weight, including bagels, bacon, and peanut butter

https://www.yahoo.com/news/fittest-woman-earth-shared-diet-110000684.html

The ‘Fittest Woman on Earth’ shared the diet she eats to lose weight, including bagels, bacon, and peanut butter

By Gabby Landsverk

March 22, 2022

Tia-Claire Toomey

Tia-Clair Toomey is a five-time CrossFit Games champ who has also competed at the Olympics in weightlifting.

Tia-Clair Toomey is a five-time CrossFit Games champion and trained for Olympic bobsled.

She said her diet was designed to help her lose weight slowly, while maintaining performance.

Toomey eats about 2,500 calories a day, including bagels, peanut butter, meat, and fruit.

To lose weight, the “Fittest Woman on Earth” relies on a heaping breakfast packed with bagels, bacon, and peanut butter, as well as plenty of protein and carbs sprinkled throughout her day, to support an intense workout schedule.

Tia-Clair Toomey, a five-time champion of the CrossFit Games, shared a YouTube video on Monday showing what she ate to transition from training for the Olympic bobsled team back to CrossFit.

CrossFit incorporates multiple fitness disciplines, from weightlifting to gymnastics, and tests of stamina, like long trail runs and open-water swimming. As a result, it can be advantageous if CrossFit athletes put on muscle mass in the offseason, then try to get leaner for competition.

Toomey’s fat-loss diet focuses on dropping weight slowly, while making sure she has plenty of energy to complete her training, according to her coach (and husband), Shane Orr.

In total, her day of eating clocks in at about 2,500 calories, compared with the 3,000 to 3,500 daily calories she consumed during bobsled season.

For breakfast, Toomey has a bagel with bacon, two eggs, another half a bagel topped with peanut butter and banana, blueberries, and supplements.

At 790 calories, it’s the biggest meal of the day with plenty of fats, protein, and carbs, which Toomey said helped her perform more effectively.

“I find I have enough energy and I recover very well,” she said.

Toomey has said she relies heavily on high-carb foods to fuel workouts. She incorporates about 790 calories’ worth of snacks throughout the day to keep her energy up, including oatmeal, bananas, fruit snacks, and protein smoothies.

Lunch is 500 calories, high-protein with quick-digesting carbs, which Toomey eats during a long break between training sessions. The meal consists of ground beef, liver, and white rice. It’s high in iron, zinc, and vitamin A.

Toomey rounds out the day with a light but filling dinner of pork tenderloin, potatoes, avocado, and salad, which is about 440 calories.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KOSvt6ME6M

 

March 25, 2022. Tags: , . Food, Sports. Leave a comment.

Technology Connections: Lessons from a Can Opener

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_mLxyIXpSY

January 19, 2022. Tags: , , , . Food, Technology. Leave a comment.

TheReportOfTheWeek: Papa John’s Shaq-a-Roni Pizza is Back!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPvISx2pFbE

September 9, 2021. Tags: , . Food. Leave a comment.

Zoe Bee: Am I WHITE TRASH? – Trash Food and the Diet of the Poor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNvQQhymT8o

August 31, 2021. Tags: , . Food. Leave a comment.

TheReportOfTheWeek: McDonald’s NEW Saweetie Meal Review!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRS6l5h0By0

August 11, 2021. Tags: , , , . Food. 1 comment.

TheReportOfTheWeek: The Worst Chicken Sandwich I Ever Had… (Buffalo Wild Wings classic chicken sandwich)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_JBmIL6CG4

July 22, 2021. Tags: , , . Food. Leave a comment.

The REAL Reason McDonald’s Ice Cream Machines Are Always Broken

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrDEtSlqJC4

July 5, 2021. Tags: , , , . Food. Leave a comment.

Good Mythical Morning: We Try EVERY Hostess Cake Flavor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVq-o5dL6jk

May 4, 2021. Tags: , , . Food. Leave a comment.

Good Mythical Morning: What’s The Best Frozen Pizza? Taste Test

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9SeECaq30g

March 24, 2021. Tags: , , , . Food. Leave a comment.

Good Mythical Morning: We Tried EVERY Pop-Tarts Flavor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPEPROdBOfE

March 2, 2021. Tags: , , . Food. Leave a comment.

Cowboy Kent Rollins: Ultimate BLT – Best Bacon, Lettuce, Tomato and Avocado Sandwich

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BiTdrSUXua8

February 26, 2021. Tags: , , , , . Food. Leave a comment.

I remember this old TV commercial for Sunkist soda, back when it didn’t have caffeine

I prefer soda without caffeine. I remember this old TV commercial. I think I heard this before I ever heard the original Beach Boys song on which it is based:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2I0yao1c8gA

July 20, 2020. Tags: , , , . Food. Leave a comment.

The Maduro diet: How most Venezuelans lost an average of 43 pounds in two years

By Daniel Alman (aka Dan from Squirrel Hill)

July 15, 2020

In May 2017, the Washington Post reported:

In a recent survey of 6,500 Venezuelan families by the country’s leading universities, three-quarters of adults said they lost weight in 2016 — an average of 19 pounds… a level of hunger almost unheard-of outside war zones or areas ravaged by hurricane, drought or plague.

In February 2018, Reuters reported:

Venezuelans reported losing on average 11 kilograms (24 lbs) in body weight last year… according to a new university study…

That’s 43 pounds in two years.

Before I explain how this came to happen, I want to start out by explaining what did not cause this to happen.
(more…)

July 15, 2020. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Communism, Economics, Food, Military, Police state, Politics, Social justice warriors, Venezuela, War against achievement. Leave a comment.

Styxhexenhammer666: The Sad Antifa Garden of Seattle, Analyzed (“This is an example of why communists often starve, because apparently none of them know how to grow food”)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9Y__lVMEMk

June 12, 2020. Tags: , , , . Antifa, Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone, Communism, Food. Leave a comment.

YouTuber AwakenWithJP: Cooking When You’re Quarantined – Cooking with a Narcissist Ep. 3

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=du9SrNvg52Y

April 13, 2020. Tags: , , , . COVID-19, Food, Humor. Leave a comment.

Dumped Milk, Smashed Eggs, Plowed Vegetables: Food Waste of the Pandemic

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/11/business/coronavirus-destroying-food.html

Dumped Milk, Smashed Eggs, Plowed Vegetables: Food Waste of the Pandemic

With restaurants, hotels and schools closed, many of the nation’s largest farms are destroying millions of pounds of fresh goods that they can no longer sell.

April 11, 2020

In Wisconsin and Ohio, farmers are dumping thousands of gallons of fresh milk into lagoons and manure pits. An Idaho farmer has dug huge ditches to bury 1 million pounds of onions. And in South Florida, a region that supplies much of the Eastern half of the United States with produce, tractors are crisscrossing bean and cabbage fields, plowing perfectly ripe vegetables back into the soil.

After weeks of concern about shortages in grocery stores and mad scrambles to find the last box of pasta or toilet paper roll, many of the nation’s largest farms are struggling with another ghastly effect of the pandemic. They are being forced to destroy tens of millions of pounds of fresh food that they can no longer sell.

The closing of restaurants, hotels and schools has left some farmers with no buyers for more than half their crops. And even as retailers see spikes in food sales to Americans who are now eating nearly every meal at home, the increases are not enough to absorb all of the perishable food that was planted weeks ago and intended for schools and businesses.

The amount of waste is staggering. The nation’s largest dairy cooperative, Dairy Farmers of America, estimates that farmers are dumping as many as 3.7 million gallons of milk each day. A single chicken processor is smashing 750,000 unhatched eggs every week.

Many farmers say they have donated part of the surplus to food banks and Meals on Wheels programs, which have been overwhelmed with demand. But there is only so much perishable food that charities with limited numbers of refrigerators and volunteers can absorb.

And the costs of harvesting, processing and then transporting produce and milk to food banks or other areas of need would put further financial strain on farms that have seen half their paying customers disappear. Exporting much of the excess food is not feasible either, farmers say, because many international customers are also struggling through the pandemic and recent currency fluctuations make exports unprofitable.

“It’s heartbreaking,” said Paul Allen, co-owner of R.C. Hatton, who has had to destroy millions of pounds of beans and cabbage at his farms in South Florida and Georgia.

The widespread destruction of fresh food — at a time when many Americans are hurting financially and millions are suddenly out of work — is an especially dystopian turn of events, even by the standards of a global pandemic. It reflects the profound economic uncertainty wrought by the virus and how difficult it has been for huge sectors of the economy, like agriculture, to adjust to such a sudden change in how they must operate.

Even as Mr. Allen and other farmers have been plowing fresh vegetables into the soil, they have had to plant the same crop again, hoping the economy will have restarted by the time the next batch of vegetables is ready to harvest. But if the food service industry remains closed, then those crops, too, may have to be destroyed.

Farmers are also learning in real time about the nation’s consumption habits.

The quarantines have shown just how many more vegetables Americans eat when meals are prepared for them in restaurants than when they have to cook for themselves.

“People don’t make onion rings at home,” said Shay Myers, a third-generation onion farmer whose fields straddle the border of Oregon and Idaho.

Mr. Myers said there were no good solutions to the fresh food glut. After his largest customer — the restaurant industry — shut down in California and New York, his farm started redistributing onions from 50-pound sacks into smaller bags that could be sold in grocery stores. He also started freezing some onions, but he has limited cold-storage capacity.

With few other options, Mr. Myers has begun burying tens of thousands of pounds of onions and leaving them to decompose in trenches.

“There is no way to redistribute the quantities that we are talking about,” he said.

Over the decades, the nation’s food banks have tried to shift from offering mostly processed meals to serving fresh produce, as well. But the pandemic has caused a shortage of volunteers, making it more difficult to serve fruits and vegetables, which are time-consuming and expensive to transport.

“To purchase from a whole new set of farmers and suppliers — it takes time, it takes knowledge, you have to find the people, develop the contracts,” said Janet Poppendieck, an expert on poverty and food assistance.

The waste has become especially severe in the dairy industry, where cows need to be milked multiple times a day, regardless of whether there are buyers.

Major consumers of dairy, like public schools and coffee shops, have all but vanished, leaving milk processing plants with fewer customers at a time of year when cows produce milk at their fastest rate. About 5 percent of the country’s milk supply is currently being dumped and that amount is expected to double if the closings are extended over the next few months, according to the International Dairy Foods Association.

Before the pandemic, the Dairymens processing plant in Cleveland would produce three loads of milk, or around 13,500 gallons, for Starbucks every day. Now the Starbucks order is down to one load every three days.

For a while after the pandemic took hold, the plant collected twice as much milk from farmers as it could process, keeping the excess supply in refrigerated trailers, said Brian Funk, who works for Dairymens as a liaison to farmers.

But eventually the plant ran out of storage. One night last week, Mr. Funk worked until 11 p.m., fighting back tears as he called farmers who supply the plant to explain the predicament.

“We’re not going to pick your milk up tomorrow,” he told them. “We don’t have any place to put it.”

One of the farms that got the call was the Hartschuh Dairy Farm, which has nearly 200 cows on a plot of land in northern Ohio.

A week ago, Rose Hartschuh, who runs the farm with her family, watched her father-in-law flush 31,000 pounds of milk into a lagoon. It took more than an hour for the milk to flow out of its refrigerated tank and down the drain pipe.

For years, dairy farmers have struggled with low prices and bankruptcies. “This is one more blow below the belt,” Ms. Hartschuh said.

To prevent further dumping, farming groups are trying everything to find places to send the excess milk — even lobbying pizza chains to increase the amount of cheese on every slice.

But there are logistical obstacles that prevent dairy products from being shifted neatly from food service customers to retailers.

At many dairy processors, for example, the machinery is designed to package shredded cheese in large bags for restaurants or place milk in small cartons for schools, rather than arrange the products in retail-friendly containers.

To repurpose those plants to put cheese in the 8 oz. bags that sell in grocery stores or bottle milk in gallon jugs would require millions of dollars in investment. For now, some processors have concluded that spending the money isn’t worth it.

“It isn’t like restaurant demand has disappeared forever,” said Matt Gould, a dairy industry analyst. “Even if it were possible to re-format to make it an 8-ounce package rather than a 20-pound bag, the dollars and cents may not pan out.”

Those same logistical challenges are bedeviling poultry plants that were set up to distribute chicken to restaurants rather than stores. Each week, the chicken processor Sanderson Farms destroys 750,000 unhatched eggs, or 5.5 percent of its total production, sending them to a rendering plant to be turned into pet food.

Last week, the chief executive of Sanderson Farms, Joe Sanderson, told analysts that company officials had even considered euthanizing chickens to avoid selling them at unprofitable rates, though the company ultimately did not take that step.

In recent days, Sanderson Farms has donated some of its chicken to food banks and organizations that cook meals for emergency medical workers. But hatching hundreds of thousands of eggs for the purpose of charity is not a viable option, said Mike Cockrell, the company’s chief financial officer.

“We’re set up to sell that chicken,” Mr. Cockrell said. “That would be an expensive proposition.”

April 12, 2020. Tags: , , , . COVID-19, Food, Health care. Leave a comment.

Brach’s new “Heart 2 Heart” candy is horrible!

Below are two images. Although they look very similar, they are for two completely different products.

The first image is the regular kind of Brach’s tiny conversation hearts Valentine’s Day candy. I really like these a lot, and have been enjoying them for years.

The second image is Brach’s new “Heart 2 Heart” tiny conversation hearts. These are horrible. The have close to zero flavor. It’s not that they taste bad – it’s that they barely have any taste, period.

I bought the bad kind because I didn’t know how horrible they were.  I mistakenly thought the only difference was that there was a message on both sides instead of just one side. I won’t make that mistake again.

I have since cleansed by palette with the good kind.

(Images from here and here.)

 

January 15, 2020. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , . Food, Holidays. Leave a comment.

This is why you should always have lots of vegetables on your burgers, pizzas, and hoagies

https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/03/health/poor-diet-blindness-scli-intl/index.html

Teenage boy goes blind after existing on Pringles, white bread and french fries

September 3, 2019

Eating a diet of french fries, Pringles and white bread was enough to make one teenage boy lose his sight, according to a case study published in a medical journal.

Scientists from the University of Bristol examined the case of a young patient whose extremely picky eating led to blindness, and have warned of the dangers of a poor diet.

The unidentified patient told doctors he had only eaten fries from the fish and chip shop, Pringles potato chips, white bread, slices of processed ham and sausage since elementary school, and he avoided foods with certain textures. He first visited a doctor at age 14, complaining of tiredness, according to a case report published in the Annals of Internal Medicine on Monday.

He wasn’t taking any medication, had a normal BMI and height, and showed no visible signs of malnutrition.

Doctors discovered low vitamin B12 levels and anemia, treating the patient with vitamin B12 injections and offering dietary advice.

One year later there were signs of hearing loss and vision symptoms, but doctors did not find the cause.

His vision had worsened to the point of blindness by 17 years of age, and doctors identified vitamin B12 deficiency, low copper and selenium levels, a high zinc level, reduced vitamin D level and bone level density, according to a statement from the University of Bristol.

By this stage, vision damage was permanent.

Researchers from Bristol Medical School and the Bristol Eye Hospital examined the case and concluded that the patient suffered nutritional optic neuropathy, a dysfunction of the optic nerve.

In developed countries it is mostly caused by bowel problems or medication that interferes with the absorption of nutrients, and it is rarely caused entirely by poor diet because food is readily available.

In some places, malnutrition caused by poverty, war and drought is linked to higher rates of nutritional optic neuropathy, according to a statement.

The condition is reversible if treated early but can lead to blindness if no action is taken.

“Our vision has such an impact on quality of life, education, employment, social interactions, and mental health,” said study lead author Denize Atan, an ophthalmologist at Bristol Medical School and Bristol Eye Hospital.

“This case highlights the impact of diet on visual and physical health, and the fact that calorie intake and BMI are not reliable indicators of nutritional status.”

The researchers say that poor diet and reduced intake of minerals caused vision loss in this case, and warn that nutritional optic neuropathy could become more common due to the consumption of junk food.

They also warned vegans to make sure to supplement for vitamin B12 to avoid deficiency.

To prevent similar cases, doctors should ask patients about their dietary history as part of routine clinical examinations, the researchers urged.

Extreme example

Tom Sanders, a professor of nutrition and dietetics at King’s College London, was critical of the case report, saying it relied on the patient’s own recall of his eating habits and did not take into account other possible explanations for the condition, including genetic defects or environmental exposures.

“Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause optic neuropathy but it is very unusual to find dietary deficiency when animal products are consumed e.g. ham and sausages which are significant sources of the vitamin B12,” he told the Science Media Centre in London.

Gary Frost, a professor of nutrition and dietetics at Imperial College London, who was not involved in the research, told CNN it is incredibly rare for someone in the UK to have a diet so limited it results in micronutrient deficiencies.

“Although it is an extreme example, it highlights the importance of having a wide and varied diet to ensure that you get the profile of nutrients and micronutrients that are needed for healthy development,” said Frost.

These deficiencies become more likely the more limited the choice of food, he added.

“Fussy eating is very common in young children and in extreme cases can lead to very limited choice of food,” said Frost.

“There is a need to pick up on eating problems such as these as early as possible so the issue around limited textures and tastes can be addressed.”

September 18, 2019. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Food. Leave a comment.

Rebecca Watson: The CDC can take my cookie dough out of my cold, dead, E. coli-infested hands

This is one of the reasons why Rebecca Watson is one of my favorite liberals. She uses statistics to explain why you can ignore the government’s warning against eating raw cookie dough:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8meTpecIt0M

December 17, 2018. Tags: , , , , . Food, Math. Leave a comment.

Name Brand vs. Generic Cereal Taste Test

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yF-OED4S9YA

December 10, 2018. Tags: , , , , , . Food. Leave a comment.

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