Here’s a bunch of horror stories from the Canadian health care system that Bernie Sanders wants the U.S. to copy

Bernie Sanders recently said the following regarding his health care plan:

“The system is going to work similarly to what exists in Canada, and what we are going to see is an expansion of Medicare where almost all doctors are now in Medicare to cover every man, woman, and child in this country.”

Since Sanders want the U.S. to copy the Canadian system of health care, here are some examples of what he is talking about:

When Robert Bourassa, the premier of Quebec, Canada, needed cancer treatment, he came to the United States and paid for his health care with his own money.

And when Canadian Liberal MP Belinda Stronach needed cancer treatment, she also came to the United States and paid for her health care with her own money.

And when Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Danny Williams needed heart surgery, he, too, came to the United States and paid for his health care with his own money.

If Sanders gets his way, and the U.S. adopts Canadian style health care, where will Canadian politicians go when they get sick?

And that’s not all.

Here are some horror stories about Canadian health care as reported in the New York Times:

Canada’s Private Clinics Surge as Public System Falters

The Cambie Surgery Center, Canada’s most prominent private hospital, may be considered a rogue enterprise.

Accepting money from patients for operations they would otherwise receive free of charge in a public hospital is technically prohibited in this country, even in cases where patients would wait months or even years before receiving treatment.

Dr. Day, 59, says. “This is a country in which dogs can get a hip replacement in under a week and in which humans can wait two to three years.”

Canada remains the only industrialized country that outlaws privately financed purchases of core medical services.

Canada has a national doctor shortage already, with 1.4 million people in the province of Ontario alone without the services of a family doctor.

The median wait time between a referral by a family doctor and an appointment with a specialist has increased to 8.3 weeks… Meanwhile the median wait between an appointment with a specialist and treatment has increased to 9.4 weeks

Average wait times between referral by a family doctor and treatment range from 5.5 weeks for oncology to 40 weeks for orthopedic surgery

And Sanders is proud of this?

And there’s still more. This is from the Toronto Sun:

Wait times for knee- and hip-replacement surgery at Southwestern Ontario hospitals are among the longest in the province

People who go under the knife to get their knees replaced in Strathroy have waited an average of 671 days for surgery

Stratford is running the second-highest wait in the province for those needing a hip replacement: the average wait there was 364 days.

In London, the region’s largest medical centre, patients waited an average of 307 days to replace a knee and 299 days to replace a hip

Caption from above photo: Judy Congdon shows how difficult standing is with her bad left hip. Congdon will wait two years for a hip replacement in London, Ont.

Londoner Judy Congdon waited more than a year to have her right knee replaced when her Strathroy surgeon told her he’d have to replace her left hip next. Told last year to expect surgery in September 2017, her date in the operating room was cancelled, and the surgery delayed a second year

I really don’t understand why Sanders thinks this is a good role model for the U.S.

And there’s still even more.

KOMO TV, a Seattle, Washington affiliate of ABC News, reported:

Some Canadian mothers forced to give birth in U.S.

SEATTLE – A problem in Canada’s hospitals is sending scores of pregnant women south of the border to have their babies.

Carri Ash of Chilliwack, B.C. was sent to the U.S. to have her baby after her water broke on Sunday, ten weeks ahead of schedule.

“And they came in and said ‘you’re going to Seattle,'” she said.

Ash’s hospital couldn’t handle the high-risk pregnancy. Doctors searched for another hospital bed, but even hospitals in Vancouver, B.C. didn’t have a neo-natal bed.

“So two provinces didn’t have enough room, so I have to go to another country,” said Ash.

Ash was sent to Swedish Medical Center where, nurses told KOMO 4 News, five Canadian women have come to have their babies in the past six weeks. Some were even airlifted at up to $5,000 per flight.

And a woman from Calgary, one of the wealthiest cities in Canada, had to travel to Montana to give birth to her identical quadruplets.

“We always regret when we have to transfer a baby or mother to another jurisdiction for care,” said Canada’s Health Minister George Abbott.

Aidan Nassey was born premature in Canada and developed breathing problems before his mother could even hold him.

“It was terrifying. And he was taken away and that was it,” said Courtney Nassey, his mother.

There wasn’t a hospital in western Canada that could take in Aidan, and a helicopter had to rush them to Seattle.

Vicki Irvine crossed the border to see her daughter, Carri Ash, give birth.

“You can’t even have a baby near home. It’s horrible,” she said.

Irvine and Ash are questioning Canada’s priorities when it comes to health care spending.

“I think it’s ridiculous that we can have the Olympics but not enough beds so I can have a baby,” said Ash.

The family says there is one benefit to their neo-natal nightmare — the newborn will have dual citizenship and, so far, they like what they see on this side of the border.

If Sanders’s health care plan gets adopted, where will those Canadian women go to give birth in the future?

The above article mentions a Canadian woman who had to go to the U.S. to give birth to quadruplets. Here is more info on her situation from canada.com

A rare set of identical quadruplets, born this week to a Calgary woman at a Montana hospital, are in good health and two of them were strong enough to be transported back here Thursday.

The naturally conceived baby girls — Autumn, Brooke, Calissa and Dahlia — were delivered by caesarean section Sunday in Great Falls, their weights ranging between two pounds, six ounces and two pounds, 15 ounces.

Their mother, Calgarian Karen Jepp, was transferred to Benefis Hospital in Montana last week when she began showing signs of going into labour, and no Canadian hospital had enough neonatal intensive-care beds for all four babies.

There was no room at any other Canadian neonatal intensive care unit, forcing CHR officials to look south of the border.

Let’s take a look at some population statistics to put that into perspective.

Canada has a population of 37 million people.

And yet according to the last paragraph in that article, there was not a single hospital in all of Canada that could accommodate that woman giving birth to four babies at the same time.

Meanwhile, Great Falls, Montana, which is right across the Canadian border, only has 59,000 people, and yet somehow, it was able to accommodate this same woman when she gave birth to four babies at once.

So a relatively small U.S. city is able to provide health care that cannot be obtained anywhere within the entire country of Canada.

And Sanders wants the U.S. to copy Canada’s system?

In January 2008, the Globe and Mail reported:

More than 150 critically ill Canadians – many with life-threatening cerebral hemorrhages – have been rushed to the United States since the spring of 2006 because they could not obtain intensive-care beds here.

Before patients with bleeding in or outside the brain have been whisked through U.S. operating-room doors, some have languished for as long as eight hours in Canadian emergency wards while health-care workers scrambled to locate care.

If the U.S. adopts Sanders’s plan, where will Canadians such as those go when they need that type of health care?

Below is a video of John Stossel’s TV special “Sick in America.” In the video, he talks about some of the problems in U.S. health care. But then he goes on to show why the U.S. should not switch to the Canadian system. Here are some examples:

19:41 A Toronto man who had a hearth attack waits and waits in an emergency room because there are not enough ICU beds to give him the treatment that he needs.

20:15 A young girl who has seizures does not have a regular pediatrician, and cannot get a bed at a hospital.

20:23 “More than a million Canadians say they can’t find a regular family doctor. Some towns, like this one, hold a lottery. Once a week, the town clerk gets this box out of the closet. Inside are the names of everyone in town who wants a family doctor. She pulls out one slip, and then calls the lucky winner.”

Stossel then goes on to explain that in order to avoid such long waiting times, some patients have gone to private clinics where they spend their own money on health care, which is illegal in Canada. Even though it’s illegal, it’s actually quite common.

21:36 A businessman makes money by helping Canadians travel to the U.S. to get the health care that they can’t get in Canada. One such example was a woman who had a blocked artery that prevented her from being able to digest her food. She was starving to death. She’d lost 50 pounds. Then she hired the businessman to help her, and she traveled to Washington state and got the health care that she needed. The American doctor said that she would have died within a few weeks if she hadn’t gotten treatment. However, the Canadian government considered her care to be “elective.”

22:11 Stossel shows that at veterinary clinics in Canada, which are privately run and privately funded, animals can get medical treatment immediately, without having to wait. All of the latest high tech equipment is available and ready.

Here’s the video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Liz2tXypFAY

So the next time that Sanders or anyone else tells you how supposedly wonderful the Canadian health care system is, and that the U.S. should copy it, you can show them these examples.

July 24, 2019. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bernie Sanders, Health care. 1 comment.

Vermont Democrats chicken out and abandon their plan for single payer health care

In this previous post, I wrote: (the bolding is new, and was not in my original post)

Vermont plans to start single payer health care in 2017

April 27, 2014

Vermont is planning to start a single payer health care system in 2017.

I support states’ rights, and I don’t live in Vermont, so I don’t have anything against Vermont doing this.

I view this the way a scientist views an experiment. I’m curious to see how it turns out.

Will Vermont stick to its plan, or will they chicken out?

Will the federal government allow it to happen, or try to block it?

Will patients’ access to health care get better, worse, or stay the same?

Will the number of doctors per person in Vermont get bigger, smaller, or stay the same?

Will costs go up, down, or stay the same?

Will politicians, celebrities, and rich people participate in it, or will they find some way to get exemptions?

Only time will tell. And I am quite curious to find out.

Unfortunately, that bolded part has come true.

Associated Press has just reported:

Governor abandons single-payer health care plan

December 17, 2014

Calling it the biggest disappointment of his career, Gov. Peter Shumlin said Wednesday he was abandoning plans to make Vermont the first state in the country with a universal, publicly funded health care system.

Going forward with a project four years in the making would require tax increases too big for the state to absorb, Shumlin said. The measure had been the centerpiece of the Democratic governor’s agenda and was watched and rooted for by single-payer health care supporters around the country.

Legislation Shumlin signed in 2011 put the state on a path to move beyond the federal Affordable Care Act by 2017 to a health care system more similar to that in neighboring Canada. Shumlin adopted the mantra that access to quality health care should be “a right and not a privilege.”

Vermont’s Democrats supported single payer health care in theory. But as the reality of the plan got closer and closer, they eventually admitted that they did not really want such a plan.

That explains why a plan that was passed in 2011 was not set to take effect until 2017. It gave Vermont’s Democrats bragging rights, so they could say they supported single payer health care. But as the 2017 deadline for actually adopting the plan got closer and closer, their bluff was revealed. They did not really support single payer health care. Instead, they just wanted to say they supported single payer health care.

Their supposed excuse for abandoning their plan was that they just found out that it would require higher taxes. Do they really expect us to believe that they were unaware of this in 2011, when they passed the plan? How dumb do they think we are?

Vermont’s Democrats are liars, and they are cowards.

To the Vermont Democrats who claim to be shocked at the fact that adopting single payer health care would require higher taxes, I post the following scene from the movie Casablanca:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjbPi00k_ME

December 18, 2014. Tags: , , , , , , . Health care, Politics. 3 comments.

Vermont plans to start single payer health care in 2017

Vermont is planning to start a single payer health care system in 2017.

I support states’ rights, and I don’t live in Vermont, so I don’t have anything against Vermont doing this.

I view this the way a scientist views an experiment. I’m curious to see how it turns out.

Will Vermont stick to its plan, or will they chicken out?

Will the federal government allow it to happen, or try to block it?

Will patients’ access to health care get better, worse, or stay the same?

Will the number of doctors per person in Vermont get bigger, smaller, or stay the same?

Will costs go up, down, or stay the same?

Will politicians, celebrities, and rich people participate in it, or will they find some way to get exemptions?

Only time will tell. And I am quite curious to find out.

 

 

April 27, 2014. Tags: , , , , , . Health care, Politics. 4 comments.