Bill Maher says the people who actually live in China don’t care about Dr. Seuss’s “racist” cartoon of a Chinese man holding chopsticks, because they’re too busy learning math and building skyscrapers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DH4v6FnbvM

March 14, 2021. Tags: , , , , , , . Cancel culture, Education, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Dr. Seuss’s drawing of African natives with mouth rings and grass skirts is not “racist.” On the contrary, it’s an example of the “diversity” that liberals are always saying they are in favor of. And here are some photographs of real life African natives to prove it.

By Daniel Alman (aka Dan from Squirrel Hill)

March 6, 2021

Here’s a drawing by Dr. Seuss, which social justice warriors claim is “racist.”

Do I think the drawing is racist?

Before answering that question, I decided to google some photographs of real life African natives.

Here are two that I found. I’m including them here under the policy of fair use:

Sources:

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/399483429416927556/

https://www.alamy.com/women-in-grass-skirts-performing-kastom-traditional-culture-dancing-image65466219.html

Now that I have looked at the photographs, my answer to the question is no. I do not think Dr. Suess’s drawing is racist.

I say this, because the mouth rings and grass skirts in Dr. Seuss’s drawing, are based on real life mouth rings and grass skirts in the two photographs.

Liberals are always saying they want “diversity.”

But now liberals are saying that Dr. Seuss’s drawing is “racist” because it included that very same diversity.

If Dr. Suess had only included white people in his drawings, liberals would be criticizing him for his lack of diversity.

This article From Yahoo! criticizes the lack of black hairstyles in modern movies. The author writes:

But the report found some short-comings, noting…  more than half of Black leading ladies in popular films from the past decade have hairstyles consistent with “European standards of beauty as opposed to natural Black hairstyles.”

So the people who create books and movies will always be accused or racism, no matter what they do. If they do show black hairstyles, they get accused of racism. If they don’t show black hairstyles, they get accused of racism.

I’m against cancel culture.

However, based on the “logic” of cancel culture, if the Dr. Seuss drawing of mouth rings and grass skirts should be “canceled,” then so should all photographs of mouth rings and grass skirts.

March 6, 2021. Tags: , , , , , , , , . Books, Cancel culture, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Ebay pulls ‘Mein Kampf’ upon discovery Hitler doodled Chinese man with chopsticks in margins [satire]

https://babylonbee.com/news/ebay-finally-pulls-mein-kampf-upon-discovery-hitler-doodled-chinese-man-with-chopsticks-in-margins

Ebay Pulls ‘Mein Kampf’ Upon Discovery Hitler Doodled Chinese Man With Chopsticks In Margins

March 5, 2021

U.S.—eBay today released a statement that they will be pulling Mein Kampf from their site after the shocking discovery that Hitler drew a Chinese character in the margin who was eating with chopsticks.

“We are horrified and saddened to discover that Adolph Hitler engaged in racist caricatures like this,” said a spokesman for eBay. “All of us deeply regret that customers enjoying a nice socialist manifesto were unwillingly exposed to such harmful bigotry. We express our deepest apologies and hope our oversight about Hitler has not contributed to racial violence against the Chinese.”

Other major distributors quickly followed suit, with Amazon additionally stopping all sales of chopsticks to people with Asian-sounding names. After seeing what corporations were doing, the Biden administration bravely denounced Hitler’s drawing and said it will be issuing executive orders imposing restrictions on Chinese restaurants so no one will ever be exposed to the harmful sight of an actual Chinese person eating with chopsticks.

Journalists questioned if there might also be problematic text in Mein Kampf, but Biden explained that “unlike a cartoon, putting people in camps and committing genocide is simply a different cultural norm! We’ve got to understand that President Xi needs to bring unity by doing lots of the same things that Hitler did, and we can’t be out there acting like he might order people’s torture while eating with chopsticks. That’s racism, systemic, kung pao! Open Biden!”

March 5, 2021. Tags: , , , , , , , , . Books, Cancel culture, Humor, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Old-School Dr. Seuss Drawings Skewer Fascism One Frightening Drawing At A Time

Original: https://www.huffpost.com/entry/dr-seuss-political-cartoon_n_5841e99ee4b09e21702ea1ba

Archive: https://web.archive.org/web/20190618210350/https://www.huffpost.com/entry/dr-seuss-political-cartoon_n_5841e99ee4b09e21702ea1ba

March 3, 2021. Tags: , , , , . Books, Cancel culture, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

In 2017, Senator Kamala Harris praised Dr. Seuss. In 2021, the administration of Vice President Kamala Harris removed Dr. Seuss from Read Across America Day.

https://nypost.com/2021/03/03/kamala-harris-tweet-wishing-dr-seuss-a-happy-birthday-resurfaces/

Kamala Harris’ tweet about Dr. Seuss resurfaces amid racial controversy

By Emily Jacobs

March 3, 2021

A 2017 tweet from Vice President Kamala Harris has resurfaced mentioning Dr. Seuss by name and quoting him, four years before her own administration would strip his name from Read Across America Day.

Harris was a senator when she sent out the tweet, dated March 2, 2017, in which she wished the famed children’s book author a happy birthday.

“Happy birthday, #DrSeuss! ‘The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go,’” the California senator wrote at the time.

The birthday of Dr. Seuss — whose real name was Theodor Seuss Geisel and who died at 87 in 1991 — was chosen by the National Educational Association in 1998 as the date for a new holiday focused on promoting children’s literacy.

This year, President Biden had mentions of Dr. Seuss scrubbed from his presidential proclamation after the late author was accused of including “racial undertones” in some of his classic, whimsical tales for children.

Dr. Seuss’ work has become the center of controversy recently following a study highlighting a lack of diversity among the author’s characters.

“Of the 2,240 (identified) human characters, there are forty-five characters of color representing 2% of the total number of human characters,” according to a 2019 study from the Conscious Kid’s Library and the University of California that examined 50 of Dr. Seuss’ books.

Last week, a Virginia school district ordered its teachers to avoid “connecting Read Across America Day with Dr. Seuss” because of recent research that allegedly “revealed strong racial undertones” in many of the author’s books.

As controversy continued to swirl, the company that oversees the publishing of Dr. Seuss’ works said it would be scrapping six of the books — “If I Ran the Zoo,” “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,” “McElligot’s Pool,” “On Beyond Zebra!,” “Scrambled Eggs Super!” and “The Cat’s Quizzer.”

When asked about why Biden’s proclamation declined to include Dr. Seuss on Tuesday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki referred reporters to the Department of Education.

“I think it is important that children of all backgrounds see themselves in the children’s books that they read, but I would point you to the Department of Education for any more details on the writing of the proclamation,” Psaki said in the White House briefing room.

A Harris spokesperson did not immediately respond to The Post’s request for comment on the tweet.

March 3, 2021. Tags: , , , , , , . Books, Cancel culture, Joe Biden, Kamala Harris, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Tucker Carlson: The memory of Dr. Seuss matters more than ever

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpcW3clYs2w

March 3, 2021. Tags: , , , , . Books, Cancel culture, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Liberals said they wanted diversity. But they just canceled several Dr. Seuss books because they depicted native people in their native clothing. Make up your mind, liberals. Is diversity good, or is diversity racist?

This article from Associated Press says that one of Dr. Seuss’s books was canceled because “an Asian person is portrayed wearing a conical hat, holding chopsticks, and eating from a bowl.”

That’s not racist.

It says another one of his books was canceled because it had “a drawing of two bare-footed African men wearing what appear to be grass skirts.”

That’s not racist.

I thought liberals were in favor of diversity.

Why are they now against it?

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/6-books-nix-books-dr-113208458.html

6 Dr. Seuss books won’t be published for racist images

By Mark Pratt

March 2, 2021

BOSTON (AP) — Six Dr. Seuss books — including “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street” and “If I Ran the Zoo” — will stop being published because of racist and insensitive imagery, the business that preserves and protects the author’s legacy said Tuesday.

“These books portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong,” Dr. Seuss Enterprises told The Associated Press in a statement that coincided with the late author and illustrator’s birthday.

“Ceasing sales of these books is only part of our commitment and our broader plan to ensure Dr. Seuss Enterprises’ catalog represents and supports all communities and families,” it said.

The other books affected are “McElligot’s Pool,” “On Beyond Zebra!,” “Scrambled Eggs Super!,” and “The Cat’s Quizzer.”

The decision to cease publication and sales of the books was made last year after months of discussion, the company, which was founded by Seuss’ family, told AP.

“Dr. Seuss Enterprises listened and took feedback from our audiences including teachers, academics and specialists in the field as part of our review process. We then worked with a panel of experts, including educators, to review our catalog of titles,” it said.

In “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,” an Asian person is portrayed wearing a conical hat, holding chopsticks, and eating from a bowl. “If I Ran the Zoo” includes a drawing of two bare-footed African men wearing what appear to be grass skirts with their hair tied above their heads.

Books by Dr. Seuss — who was born Theodor Seuss Geisel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904 —- have been translated into dozens of languages as well as in braille and are sold in more than 100 countries. He died in 1991.

He remains popular, earning an estimated $33 million before taxes in 2020, up from just $9.5 million five years ago, the company said. Forbes listed him No. 2 on its highest-paid dead celebrities of 2020, behind only the late pop star Michael Jackson.

Random House Children Books, Dr. Seuss’ publisher, issued a brief statement Tuesday: “We respect the decision of Dr. Seuss Enterprises (DSE) and the work of the panel that reviewed this content last year, and their recommendation.”

As adored as Dr. Seuss is by millions around the world for the positive values in many of his works, including environmentalism and tolerance, there has been increasing criticism in recent years over the way Blacks, Asians and others are drawn in some of his most beloved children’s books, as well as in his earlier advertising and propaganda illustrations.

The National Education Association, which founded Read Across America Day in 1998 and deliberately aligned it with Geisel’s birthday, has for several years deemphasized Seuss and encouraged a more diverse reading list for children.

School districts across the country have also moved away from Dr. Seuss, prompting Loudoun County, Virginia, schools just outside Washington, D.C., to douse rumors last month that they were banning the books entirely.

“Research in recent years has revealed strong racial undertones in many books written/illustrated by Dr. Seuss,” the school district said in a statement.

In 2017, a school librarian in Cambridge, Massachusetts, criticized a gift of 10 Seuss books from first lady Melania Trump, saying many of his works were “steeped in racist propaganda, caricatures, and harmful stereotypes.”

In 2018, a Dr. Seuss museum in his hometown of Springfield removed a mural that included an Asian stereotype.

“The Cat in the Hat,” one of Seuss’ most popular books, has received criticism, too, but will continue to be published for now.

Dr. Seuss Enterprises, however, said it is “committed to listening and learning and will continue to review our entire portfolio.”

The move to cease publication of the books drew immediate reaction on social media from those who called it another example of “cancel culture.”

“We’ve now got foundations book burning the authors to whom they are dedicated. Well done, everyone,” conservative commentator and author Ben Shapiro tweeted.

Others approved of the decision.

“The books we share with our children matter. Books shape their world view and tell them how to relate to the people, places, and ideas around them. As grown-ups, we have to examine the worldview we are creating for our children, including carefully re-examining our favorites,” Rebekah Fitzsimmons, an assistant teaching professor at Carnegie Mellon University, tweeted.

Numerous other popular children’s series have been criticized in recent years for alleged racism.

In the 2007 book, “Should We Burn Babar?,” the author and educator Herbert R. Kohl contended that the “Babar the Elephant” books were celebrations of colonialism because of how the title character leaves the jungle and later returns to “civilize” his fellow animals.

One of the books, “Babar’s Travels,” was removed from the shelves of a British library in 2012 because of its alleged stereotypes of Africans. Critics also have faulted the “Curious George” books for their premise of a white man bringing home a monkey from Africa.

And Laura Ingalls Wilder’s portrayals of Native Americans in her “Little House On the Prairie” novels have been faulted so often that the American Library Association removed her name in 2018 from a lifetime achievement award it gives out each year. The association still gives out the Geisel Award for “the most distinguished American book for beginning readers published in English in the United States during the preceding year.”

March 2, 2021. Tags: , , , , . Books, Cancel culture, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

6 Dr. Seuss books won’t be published for racist images

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/6-books-nix-books-dr-113208458.html

6 Dr. Seuss books won’t be published for racist images

By Mark Pratt

March 2, 2021

BOSTON (AP) — Six Dr. Seuss books — including “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street” and “If I Ran the Zoo” — will stop being published because of racist and insensitive imagery, the business that preserves and protects the author’s legacy said Tuesday.

“These books portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong,” Dr. Seuss Enterprises told The Associated Press in a statement that coincided with the late author and illustrator’s birthday.

“Ceasing sales of these books is only part of our commitment and our broader plan to ensure Dr. Seuss Enterprises’ catalog represents and supports all communities and families,” it said.

The other books affected are “McElligot’s Pool,” “On Beyond Zebra!,” “Scrambled Eggs Super!,” and “The Cat’s Quizzer.”

The decision to cease publication and sales of the books was made last year after months of discussion, the company, which was founded by Seuss’ family, told AP.

“Dr. Seuss Enterprises listened and took feedback from our audiences including teachers, academics and specialists in the field as part of our review process. We then worked with a panel of experts, including educators, to review our catalog of titles,” it said.

In “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,” an Asian person is portrayed wearing a conical hat, holding chopsticks, and eating from a bowl. “If I Ran the Zoo” includes a drawing of two bare-footed African men wearing what appear to be grass skirts with their hair tied above their heads.

Books by Dr. Seuss — who was born Theodor Seuss Geisel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904 —- have been translated into dozens of languages as well as in braille and are sold in more than 100 countries. He died in 1991.

He remains popular, earning an estimated $33 million before taxes in 2020, up from just $9.5 million five years ago, the company said. Forbes listed him No. 2 on its highest-paid dead celebrities of 2020, behind only the late pop star Michael Jackson.

Random House Children Books, Dr. Seuss’ publisher, issued a brief statement Tuesday: “We respect the decision of Dr. Seuss Enterprises (DSE) and the work of the panel that reviewed this content last year, and their recommendation.”

As adored as Dr. Seuss is by millions around the world for the positive values in many of his works, including environmentalism and tolerance, there has been increasing criticism in recent years over the way Blacks, Asians and others are drawn in some of his most beloved children’s books, as well as in his earlier advertising and propaganda illustrations.

The National Education Association, which founded Read Across America Day in 1998 and deliberately aligned it with Geisel’s birthday, has for several years deemphasized Seuss and encouraged a more diverse reading list for children.

School districts across the country have also moved away from Dr. Seuss, prompting Loudoun County, Virginia, schools just outside Washington, D.C., to douse rumors last month that they were banning the books entirely.

“Research in recent years has revealed strong racial undertones in many books written/illustrated by Dr. Seuss,” the school district said in a statement.

In 2017, a school librarian in Cambridge, Massachusetts, criticized a gift of 10 Seuss books from first lady Melania Trump, saying many of his works were “steeped in racist propaganda, caricatures, and harmful stereotypes.”

In 2018, a Dr. Seuss museum in his hometown of Springfield removed a mural that included an Asian stereotype.

“The Cat in the Hat,” one of Seuss’ most popular books, has received criticism, too, but will continue to be published for now.

Dr. Seuss Enterprises, however, said it is “committed to listening and learning and will continue to review our entire portfolio.”

The move to cease publication of the books drew immediate reaction on social media from those who called it another example of “cancel culture.”

“We’ve now got foundations book burning the authors to whom they are dedicated. Well done, everyone,” conservative commentator and author Ben Shapiro tweeted.

Others approved of the decision.

“The books we share with our children matter. Books shape their world view and tell them how to relate to the people, places, and ideas around them. As grown-ups, we have to examine the worldview we are creating for our children, including carefully re-examining our favorites,” Rebekah Fitzsimmons, an assistant teaching professor at Carnegie Mellon University, tweeted.

Numerous other popular children’s series have been criticized in recent years for alleged racism.

In the 2007 book, “Should We Burn Babar?,” the author and educator Herbert R. Kohl contended that the “Babar the Elephant” books were celebrations of colonialism because of how the title character leaves the jungle and later returns to “civilize” his fellow animals.

One of the books, “Babar’s Travels,” was removed from the shelves of a British library in 2012 because of its alleged stereotypes of Africans. Critics also have faulted the “Curious George” books for their premise of a white man bringing home a monkey from Africa.

And Laura Ingalls Wilder’s portrayals of Native Americans in her “Little House On the Prairie” novels have been faulted so often that the American Library Association removed her name in 2018 from a lifetime achievement award it gives out each year. The association still gives out the Geisel Award for “the most distinguished American book for beginning readers published in English in the United States during the preceding year.”

March 2, 2021. Tags: , , , , , . Books, Cancel culture, Political correctness, Racism, Social justice warriors. 1 comment.