Medical school cancels honor society because whites and Asians were earning better grades than blacks and Latinos

According to this article from NPR, at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, in order to get into the Alpha Omega Alpha honor society, you have to be in the top 25% of your graduating class.

The school is eliminating the honor society because not enough blacks and Latinos were graduating in the top 25%.

I’m not sure how getting rid of this honor society makes anyone better off.

On the contrary – I see this as just one more example of the dumbing down of America’s educational system.

As to the issue of why blacks and Latinos are underrepresented in the top 25%, my guess is that the school has lower admissions standards for blacks and Latinos than for everyone else. I could be wrong. And I’d be curious to hear anyone else explain a different reason in the comment section.

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/09/05/643298219/a-medical-school-tradition-comes-under-fire-for-racism

A Medical School Tradition Comes Under Fire For Racism

September 5, 2018

Senior medical student Giselle Lynch has plenty of accomplishments to list when she applies for a coveted spot in an ophthalmology residency program this fall.

But one box she won’t be able to check when she submits her application is one of the highest academic awards medical students can receive, election to the honor society Alpha Omega Alpha.

It’s not because she didn’t excel. It’s because her medical school, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, put a moratorium on student nominations because it determined the selection process discriminates against students of color.

The award is open to the top 25 percent of a medical school’s graduating class and can be a valuable career boost, making students more competitive for desirable residencies and jobs.

Icahn administrators say the disparities in the selection process reflect deeper issues of racial inequality in medical education.

“AOA perpetuates systems that are deeply flawed,” says Dr. David Muller, the dean for medical education at Icahn. “We can’t justify putting people who are historically at a disadvantage at an even greater disadvantage. It just doesn’t seem fair to dangle in front of our students an honorific that we know people are not equally eligible for.”

Over the past five years, around 3 percent of students chosen for the distinction at Icahn were from a racial background that is underrepresented in medicine, which includes blacks and Latinos. In that same period, about 18 percent to 20 percent of each graduating class at Icahn came from those groups.

The school made the change after Lynch led a group of fellow students in an effort to fight inequality at Icahn. The students collected data on how many students from underrepresented minorities were nominated to the honor society at Icahn and presented it in a series of meetings with school leadership last year.

Lynch, who is black, recalls one particularly moving meeting when they showed photographs of Icahn’s past AOA students — and black and Latino faces were conspicuously sparse.

“Where are we? We’re nowhere here,” says Lynch, remembering her reaction. “AOA is an award of student excellence. What was the argument that was being perpetuated about us if we’re not being included?”

Announced in May of this year, the decision at Icahn was a controversial one, because many students and faculty fear that not participating in the award puts Icahn students at a disadvantage when competing for slots in residency programs.

The honor society has existed since 1902 and is a sought-after line on the résumés of medical students across the country. Membership can help students secure training in competitive specialties and is a predictor of success in academic medicine.

Membership is generally open to the top 25 percent of medical students in a graduating class, as determined by their grades and scores on standardized tests, but only about 16 percent makes it in. Each medical school has its own criteria for making final selections including qualities like leadership or professionalism.

Icahn is not alone in selecting a disproportionately low number of minority students for the honor society. A 2017 study in JAMA Internal Medicine showed that nationwide, black and Asian students were less likely than their white counterparts to be selected for the honor.

Dr. Dowin Boatright, the study’s lead author and an assistant professor of emergency medicine at Yale, hypothesizes that the disparities may be related to racial inequalities in grading and standardized tests, a phenomenon well-documented in medical education literature. Grading based on clinical performance is subjective, he notes, since it often reflects a global assessment of a student rather than technical skills or performance on a test.

“You’re graded on things that are completely vulnerable to bias, like, ‘How good is this medical student?’ ” Boatright says.

Other medical schools are also considering how their AOA chapters can accurately reflect the racial makeup of their student bodies, according to Dr. Eve Higginbotham, the president of AOA board. And at the University of California, San Francisco, faculty and students are debating whether the honor society has a future there.

“Systems we use [for student evaluation] fail to take into account the extra work minorities are doing,” says Dr. Catherine Lucey, vice dean for education at UCSF. “[Minority] students have more stressors they have to deal with, low levels of racism that exist in our patients and our clinical environments.”

Lucey says that UCSF changed its selection criteria for AOA in 2016 to focus less on grades. The number of minority students selected for the honor society that year increased to match the percentage of minorities in each graduating class.

Dr. Jonathan Giftos, an internist in New York who was president of the Icahn chapter when he graduated in 2012, says disparities in the honor society are important to address because when medical education favors white students that can mean fewer minorities in leadership roles.

“It feels like a layering on of accolades that makes people who are doing well do better, have more access and power and opportunity,” Giftos says.

National AOA leadership says that diversity is a priority for the organization, but since every medical school is different, they leave the specifics of how students are chosen up to the school.

“We know that improving diversity will hopefully result in inclusion of talented individuals from different backgrounds, and that will help benefit our patient care,” says Dr. Richard Byyny, executive director of AOA. “But the schools themselves need to tackle this.”

Muller notes that Icahn has not officially closed its AOA chapter and will still nominate faculty and residents.

And student activists at Icahn aren’t celebrating yet. Lynch says she now wants to focus on discrimination in grading and medical school admissions. This, she says, can help address the dearth of minority physicians in different specialities — a problem with negative consequences for the health of minority patients.

“Many of us are still wary,” Lynch says. “It is a symbolic gesture, actually. We are interested in the deeper work.”

September 8, 2018. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , . Dumbing down, Education, Health care, Political correctness, Racism, Social justice warriors. 2 comments.

Shame on Trump for continuing Obama’s insane policy of hiring air-traffic controllers based on race instead of merit!

When Obama was president, he abandoned the old system of hiring qualified air-traffic controllers who had a college degree in air-traffic control and/or were military veterans with aviation experience, because too many of these people were white males. Obama then replaced the old system with a new system that tried to achieve racial diversity by asking applicants how many different sports they had played when they were in high school. I explain this below in detail.

But first, I want to post this new video from Fox News, which shows that Trump is continuing with Obama’s ridiculous policy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qh9SxqsQdpo

The Wall St. Journal has also written an article about Trump’s continuation of Obama’s absurd policy, which you can read at this link.

Now, to explain Obama’s policy in detail.

When Obama was president, the Federal Aviation Administration stopped giving preferential treatment to air-traffic controller applicants who had passed classes from the 36 FAA-approved college aviation programs across the U.S., because too many of the people who passed these classes were white males.

At the same time, the FAA also stopped giving preference to applicants who were military veterans with aviation experience.

Under the new system, applicants were asked how many different high school sports they had participated in.

In 2014, the Wall St. Journal reported:

For years, aspiring air-traffic controllers in the U.S. have enrolled in schools selected by the Federal Aviation Administration to offer special courses that could smooth the way for a job at the agency.

But at the end of December, the FAA abruptly ended that special status for the 36 participating colleges and universities…

… some critics suspect it is intended partly to increase the share of minorities and women among controllers, who are now 83% male and white…

Some school officials say their controller enrollment already has fallen off because of the FAA change.

The FAA’s new stance “just doesn’t make sense,” said Douglas Williams, aviation-program director at the Community College of Baltimore County in Catonsville, Md… “They’re not getting the best-qualified applicants this way,” he said.

Students who have studied for the controller degrees fear they wasted time and money. Navy veteran Oscar Vega recently completed the two-year air-traffic program at Mt. San Antonio College in Walnut, Calif. He said he passed the FAA controller aptitude test last year, so he was shocked when, in February, he failed the biographical assessment.

“They say you can take it again,” said the 28-year-old. “But it’s not a test you can study for. And we don’t know why we failed because we don’t get any feedback.”

The schools estimate that more than 3,000 graduates have been removed from the FAA’s hiring pool because of the new policy.

In 2014, the Chicago Tribune reported:

More than half of the latest batch of air-traffic controller job offers nationwide went to people with no aviation experience…

The hiring breakdown marks a major shift in FAA recruitment strategy, which is now geared toward… attracting more minorities and women to the nation’s largely white and male controller work force

For almost the last 25 years, until the off-the-street hiring process was implemented in February, the FAA recruited controllers heavily from among military veterans possessing aviation experience and from the 36 FAA-approved college aviation programs across the U.S.

A sample version of the new test includes the following question:

21. The number of different high school sports I participated in was:

A- 4 or more

B- 3

C- 2

D- 1

E- didn’t play sports

Trump has now been president for more than a year, and this policy remains in place.

Shame on Trump for continuing Obama’s insane policy of hiring air-traffic controllers based on race instead of merit!

 

June 6, 2018. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Barack Obama, Donald Trump, Dumbing down, Education, Politics, Racism. Leave a comment.

Wall St. Journal: The Airport Control Tower Is No Place for Racial Redress

https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-airport-control-tower-is-no-place-for-racial-redress-1528240025

The Airport Control Tower Is No Place for Racial Redress

The Obama FAA grounded qualified candidates in the name of justice. Why isn’t Trump moving to reverse?

June 5, 2018

Andrew Brigida is the son of a former New York City police officer. When he was 12, his family moved to a suburb of Phoenix, and at the urging of a neighbor he decided to become an air-traffic controller. In 2013 he graduated with two aviation-related bachelor’s degrees from Arizona State University, one of the dozens of schools with which the Federal Aviation Administration has partnerships to vet candidates for its air-traffic-control training program.

Graduates of these Collegiate Training Initiative schools then must pass the Air Traffic Selection and Training exam, or AT-SAT. This eight-hour test is designed to assess numeric ability, tolerance for high-intensity work, capacity for solving problems, and so forth. The goal is to determine their likelihood of completing the requisite training to become an air-traffic controller. Training a controller is expensive—on average it costs more than $400,000—and the CTI system has proved an accurate predictor of who’s got what it takes.

Mr. Brigida completed the college program, aced the AT-SAT and received a strong recommendation from an academic adviser. He was then placed on a list with other prospective controllers, who would be sent to Oklahoma City for the mandated 15 weeks of training. Five years later, Mr. Brigida still is not working as an air-traffic controller. What happened is the Obama administration.

In 2013 the Obama FAA changed the process for hiring controllers and then applied the new policy retroactively. No longer would the FAA give hiring preference to applicants with degrees from CTI schools or military experience, as it had in the past. In order to foster “diversity” in control towers, the agency would move away from merit-based hiring and toward more subjective measures. To attract a higher percentage of candidates from racial and ethnic minorities, a “biographical questionnaire,” or BQ, was added to the screening process. Applicants were asked about their upbringing, family hardship and the like. Those who didn’t score well enough on the BQ were deemed ineligible, regardless of how well they had performed on tests measuring cognitive skills.

What’s worse, Mr. Brigida and some 2,600 others already on the FAA referral list were notified that their AT-SAT results would be tossed and that they would need to reapply. Mr. Brigida did so but was told that he had failed the BQ and was no longer eligible to become an air-traffic controller.

“The most shocking thing to me is that nobody in that room when this change was decided—not the secretary of transportation, not the head of the FAA—raised his hand and said that we’re talking about airline safety here,” said William Perry Pendley of the Mountain States Legal Foundation, a public-interest law firm that is representing Mr. Brigida and other plaintiffs in a discrimination lawsuit against the federal government. “We’re not talking about somebody driving a truck. We’re talking about somebody guiding an aircraft into snowbound Chicago.”

Equally shocking is the revelation that the Trump administration is fighting in court to preserve the Obama-era policy. Like its predecessor, this administration is ignoring the fact that thousands of people like Mr. Brigida dedicated years of their lives to getting the proper schooling—in some cases incurring significant debt—only to see the rules changed in the middle of the game. Moreover, the changes weren’t to streamline the process or improve safety but rather to achieve what the government decided (for now) is the “right” racial mix.

The Trump administration should be returning to a sensible system that prioritizes objective measures of competence. After all, being a controller means making life-or-death decisions on a regular basis. Instead, the administration has opted to preserve a policy that in practice amounts to thinly disguised discrimination in the service of boosting the number of minority air-traffic controllers.

The Trump administration didn’t respond to my questions about the case, but the proper course of action is clear: Settle with Mr. Brigida and the thousands of other eminently qualified plaintiffs. Allow them to embark on careers as air-traffic controllers. And then reverse the wrongheaded and potentially dangerous hiring procedures implemented by an Obama administration obsessed with racial balance.

Mr. Pendley believes that his clients are victims of blatant racial discrimination and that the FAA’s current hiring practices won’t withstand scrutiny by the courts. If you care more about your plane landing safely than about the racial makeup of folks manning the airport control tower, you should hope his lawsuit succeeds.

 

June 6, 2018. Tags: , , , , , , , , . Barack Obama, Donald Trump, Racism. Leave a comment.

Real world evidence proves that affirmative action hurts black people

This article is from the Atlantic – not exactly a bastion of the political right.

It says that although the supporters of affirmative action have good intentions, the actual results are that the policy hurts black students. It hurts them by putting them into schools that are above their ability, so they either end up dropping out, or, they abandon the STEM major that they had wanted in exchange for an easier major.

It also talks about how blacks are more likely to have white friends at the school if the school does not have affirmative action, because people tend to choose friends who are of the same academic ability as their own.

It also talks about how blacks are happier at schools that don’t have affirmative action because there is never any question as to their qualifications.

It also says that the same problems happen with white students who are admitted for athletic reasons, and for legacy admissions too.

But most importantly, it says that blacks benefited when UCLA banned affirmative action. After the school ended affirmative action, the number of black freshman was cut in half. However, the number of blacks from these freshman classes who went on to graduate stayed the same.

In other words, UCLA’s elimination of affirmative action did not reduce the number of blacks who graduated from UCLA. Instead, UCLA’s elimination of affirmative action only reduced the number of blacks who dropped out of UCLA.

So instead of getting admitted to UCLA by affirmative action and then dropping out of UCLA because the work at UCLA was too hard for them, these blacks ended up going to easier colleges, where they were admitted based on merit, so they were capable of doing the work, and so they had a much better chance of graduating.

I’d also like to comment on this one sentence from a different article which was published in the New York Times:

“A 2009 Princeton study showed Asian-Americans had to score 140 points higher on their SATs than whites, 270 points higher than Hispanics and 450 points higher than blacks to have the same chance of admission to leading universities.”

That sentence is in complete agreement with everything that is in the Atlantic article. That one sentence explains how affirmative actions sets blacks up for failure and dropping out by putting them into schools that are too difficult for them. We should get rid of affirmative action, and put blacks into schools that they get into based on merit. That way, they will have a much better chance of graduating.

Here is the Atlantic article. The bolding is mine:

https://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2012/10/the-painful-truth-about-affirmative-action/263122/

The Painful Truth About Affirmative Action

Why racial preferences in college admissions hurt minority students — and shroud the education system in dishonesty.

October 2, 2012

Affirmative action in university admissions started in the late 1960s as a noble effort to jump-start racial integration and foster equal opportunity. But somewhere along the decades, it has lost its way.

Over time, it has become a political lightning rod and one of our most divisive social policies. It has evolved into a regime of racial preferences at almost all selective schools — preferences so strikingly large and politically unpopular that administrators work hard to conceal them. The largest, most aggressive preferences are usually reserved for upper-middle-class minorities on whom they often inflict significant academic harm, whereas more modest policies that could help working-class and poor people of all races are given short shrift. Academic leaders often find themselves flouting the law and acting in ways that aggravate the worst consequences of large preferences. They have become prisoners of a system that many privately deplore for its often-perverse unintended effects but feel they cannot escape.

The single biggest problem in this system — a problem documented by a vast and growing array of research — is the tendency of large preferences to boomerang and harm their intended beneficiaries. Large preferences often place students in environments where they can neither learn nor compete effectively — even though these same students would thrive had they gone to less competitive but still quite good schools.

We refer to this problem as “mismatch,” a word that largely explains why, even though blacks are more likely to enter college than are whites with similar backgrounds, they will usually get much lower grades, rank toward the bottom of the class, and far more often drop out. Because of mismatch, racial preference policies often stigmatize minorities, reinforce pernicious stereotypes, and undermine the self-confidence of beneficiaries, rather than creating the diverse racial utopias so often advertised in college campus brochures.

The mismatch effect happens when a school extends to a student such a large admissions preference — sometimes because of a student’s athletic prowess or legacy connection to the school, but usually because of the student’s race — that the student finds himself in a class where he has weaker academic preparation than nearly all of his classmates. The student who would flourish at, say, Wake Forest or the University of Richmond, instead finds himself at Duke, where the professors are not teaching at a pace designed for him — they are teaching to the “middle” of the class, introducing terms and concepts at a speed that is unnerving even to the best-prepared student.

The student who is underprepared relative to others in that class falls behind from the start and becomes increasingly lost as the professor and his classmates race ahead. His grades on his first exams or papers put him at the bottom of the class. Worse, the experience may well induce panic and self-doubt, making learning even harder.

When explaining to friends how academic mismatch works, we sometimes say: Think back to high school and recall a subject at which you did fine but did not excel. Suppose you had suddenly been transferred into an advanced class in that subject with a friend who was about at your level and 18 other students who excelled in the subject and had already taken the intermediate course you just skipped. You would, in all likelihood, soon be struggling to keep up. The teacher might give you some extra attention but, in class, would be focusing on the median student, not you and your friend, and would probably be covering the material at what, to you, was a bewildering pace.

Wouldn’t you have quickly fallen behind and then continued to fall farther and farther behind as the school year progressed? Now assume that you and the friend who joined you at the bottom of that class were both black and everyone else was Asian or white. How would that have felt? Might you have imagined that this could reinforce in the minds of your classmates the stereotype that blacks are weak students?

So we have a terrible confluence of forces putting students in classes for which they aren’t prepared, causing them to lose confidence and underperform even more while, at the same time, consolidating the stereotype that they are inherently poor students. And you can see how at each level there are feedback effects that reinforce the self-doubts of all the students who are struggling.

Of course, being surrounded by very able peers can confer benefits, too — the atmosphere may be more intellectually challenging, and one may learn a lot from observing others. We have no reason to think that small preferences are not, on net, beneficial. But contemporary racial preferences used by selective schools — especially those extended to blacks and Native Americans — tend to be extremely large, often amounting to the equivalent of hundreds of SAT points.

At the University of Texas, whose racial preference programs come before the Supreme Court for oral argument on October 10, the typical black student receiving a race preference placed at the 52nd percentile of the SAT; the typical white was at the 89th percentile. In other words, Texas is putting blacks who score at the middle of the college-aspiring population in the midst of highly competitive students. This is the sort of academic gap where mismatch flourishes. And, of course, mismatch does not occur merely with racial preferences; it shows up with large preferences of all types.

Research on the mismatch problem was almost non-existent until the mid-1990s; it has developed rapidly in the past half-dozen years, especially among labor economists. To cite just a few examples of the findings:

Black college freshmen are more likely to aspire to science or engineering careers than are white freshmen, but mismatch causes blacks to abandon these fields at twice the rate of whites.

Blacks who start college interested in pursuing a doctorate and an academic career are twice as likely to be derailed from this path if they attend a school where they are mismatched.

About half of black college students rank in the bottom 20 percent of their classes (and the bottom 10 percent in law school).

Black law school graduates are four times as likely to fail bar exams as are whites; mismatch explains half of this gap.

Interracial friendships are more likely to form among students with relatively similar levels of academic preparation; thus, blacks and Hispanics are more socially integrated on campuses where they are less academically mismatched.

Given the severity of the mismatch problem, and the importance of diversity issues to university leaders, one might expect that understanding and addressing mismatch would be at the very top of the academic agenda.

But in fact it is a largely invisible issue. With striking uniformity, university leaders view discussion of the mismatch problem as a threat to affirmative action and to racial peace on campuses, and therefore a subject to be avoided. They suppress data and even often ostracize faculty who attempt to point out the seriousness of mismatch. (See, for instance, the case of UT professor Lino Graglia, who was condemned by university officials after he observed that black and Mexican-American students were “not academically competitive” with their white peers.) We believe that the willful denial of the mismatch issue is as big a problem as mismatch itself.

A powerful example of these problems comes from UCLA, an elite school that used large racial preferences until the Proposition 209 ban took effect in 1998. The anticipated, devastating effects of the ban on preferences at UCLA and Berkeley on minorities were among the chief exhibits of those who attacked Prop 209 as a racist measure. Many predicted that over time blacks and Hispanics would virtually disappear from the UCLA campus.

And there was indeed a post-209 drop in minority enrollment as preferences were phased out. Although it was smaller and more short-lived than anticipated, it was still quite substantial: a 50 percent drop in black freshman enrollment and a 25 percent drop for Hispanics. These drops precipitated ongoing protests by students and continual hand-wringing by administrators, and when, in 2006, there was a particularly low yield of black freshmen, the campus was roiled with agitation, so much so that the university reinstituted covert, illegal racial preferences.

Throughout these crises, university administrators constantly fed agitation against the preference ban by emphasizing the drop in undergraduate minority admissions. Never did the university point out one overwhelming fact: The total number of black and Hispanic students receiving bachelor’s degrees were the same for the five classes after Prop 209 as for the five classes before.

How was this possible? First, the ban on preferences produced better-matched students at UCLA, students who were more likely to graduate. The black four-year graduation rate at UCLA doubled from the early 1990s to the years after Prop 209.

Second, strong black and Hispanic students accepted UCLA offers of admission at much higher rates after the preferences ban went into effect; their choices seem to suggest that they were eager to attend a school where the stigma of a preference could not be attached to them. This mitigated the drop in enrollment.

Third, many minority students who would have been admitted to UCLA with weak qualifications before Prop 209 were admitted to less elite schools instead; those who proved their academic mettle were able to transfer up to UCLA and graduate there.

Thus, Prop 209 changed the minority experience at UCLA from one of frequent failure to much more consistent success. The school granted as many bachelor degrees to minority students as it did before Prop 209 while admitting many fewer and thus dramatically reducing failure and drop-out rates. It was able, in other words, to greatly reduce mismatch.

But university officials were unable or unwilling to advertise this fact. They regularly issued statements suggesting that Prop 209’s consequences had caused unalloyed harm to minorities, and they suppressed data on actual student performance. The university never confronted the mismatch problem, and rather than engage in a candid discussion of the true costs and benefits of a ban on preferences, it engineered secret policies to violate Prop 209’s requirement that admissions be colorblind.

The odd dynamics behind UCLA’s official behavior exist throughout the contemporary academic world. The quest for racial sensitivity has created environments in which it is not only difficult but downright risky for students and professors, not to mention administrators, to talk about what affirmative action has become and about the nature and effects of large admissions preferences. Simply acknowledging the fact that large preferences exist can trigger accusations that one is insulting or stigmatizing minority groups; suggesting that these preferences have counterproductive effects can lead to the immediate inference that one wants to eliminate or cut back efforts to help minority students.

The desire to be sensitive has sealed off failing programs from the scrutiny and dialogue necessary for healthy progress. It has also made racial preferences a force for economic inequality: academically well-prepared working class and poor Asian and white students are routinely passed over in favor of black and Hispanic students who are more affluent as well as less well-prepared.

The way racial preferences affect student outcomes is only part of the story. Equally relevant is the way the academic community has proved unequal to the task of reform — showing great resourcefulness in blocking access to information, enforcing homogenous preference policies across institutions, and evading even legal restrictions on the use of preferences. All of this makes the quest for workable reforms — which are most likely to come from the Supreme Court — both more complex and more interesting than one might at first suspect.

 

June 5, 2018. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Education, Racism. Leave a comment.

By threatening to disrupt classes, Black Lives Matter unintentionally proves that professor who criticized affirmative action is correct

Amy Wax, a professor who teaches at University of Pennsylvania law school, said the school has lower admission standards for blacks than for whites.

Her claim is backed up by this New York Times article:

A 2009 Princeton study showed Asian-Americans had to score 140 points higher on their SATs than whites, 270 points higher than Hispanics and 450 points higher than blacks to have the same chance of admission to leading universities.

Since University of Pennsylvania is an Ivy League school, if falls under that category of “leading universities.” The SAT (for admission to undergraduate school) is not the same as the LSAT (for admission to law school), but the basic principle of having different admission standards for different races is the same.

The school punished professor Wax for her statement by banning her from teaching first year classes, but the school has refused to provide any proof that her statement was false.

Black Lives Matter said they will start disrupting classes if the school does not fire her. In my opinion, a much better response would have been for Black Lives Matter to challenge professor Wax to a debate on the subject.

In fact, by threatening to disrupt classes instead of challenging professor Wax to a debate, Black Lives Matter has just proved that professor Wax’s claim is correct. Anyone who is truly qualified to get into an Ivy League law school would rather participate in a debate than disrupt classes.

Black Lives Matter has unintentionally confirmed that professor Wax’s statement is true.

 

March 20, 2018. Tags: , , , , , , , , , . Dumbing down, Education, Political correctness, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

School shootings, affirmative action, disparate impact, the school to prison pipeline, mortgage defaults, Barack Obama, and Trayvon Martin

Nikolas Cruz is the scumbag who murdered 17 people at Stoneman Douglas High School earlier this month. The school is part of the Broward County school district in Florida.
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February 25, 2018. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Barack Obama, Guns, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Video: Hypocrites support affirmative action for college admissions but oppose it for basketball team

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWYwYMNnU5c

August 4, 2017. Tags: , , , , , . Political correctness, Racism, Social justice warriors. Leave a comment.

Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor’s training was “fast tracked” so the city could “add diversity” to its police force

Mohamed Noor is the Minneapolis police officer who recently shot and killed an innocent, unarmed, law abiding woman named Justine Damond, after Damond had called 911 to report that she had heard a possible sexual assault taking place near her home.

Officer Moor has not offered any explanation for his actions. He is not claiming self defense.
(more…)

July 23, 2017. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , . Dumbing down, Immigration, Islamization, Police brutality, Political correctness, Racism, Social justice warriors, Violent crime. 3 comments.

Obama’s Justice Department seeks to hire “Trial Attorney, GS-14/15” with “mental retardation”

https://web.archive.org/web/20100208235606/http://www.justice.gov/oarm/jobs/attorneyvotingoarm2010.htm

U. S. Department of Justice

Civil Rights Division, Voting Section

Trial Attorney, GS-14/15

The U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division is seeking up to 10 experienced attorneys for the position of Trial Attorney in the Voting Section in Washington, D.C. The Civil Rights Division is primarily responsible for enforcing federal statutes and executive orders that prohibit, among other things, unlawful discrimination in voting, education, employment, housing, police services, public accommodations and facilities, and federally funded and conducted programs. The Voting Section enforces federal statutes designed to safeguard the right to vote. These statutes include the Voting Rights Act, as amended; the National Voter Registration Act; the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act; and the Help America Vote Act.

Trial attorneys are responsible for conducting investigations, litigation, and other activities addressing all aspects of the Voting Section’s enforcement duties. These positions may require extended hours and some positions may involve significant travel.

APPLICATION PROCESS: The primary method of applying for this vacancy is online via the Internet at http://www.avuedigitalservices.com/dojjmd/applicant.html. If you do not have access to the Internet you are strongly encouraged to visit your library, state employment commission, or a commercial establishment that provides Internet access to apply online. If you are unable to apply online, you may call the contact phone number listed on this announcement to obtain a copy of the vacancy announcement, applicant qualification form (Form No. F-15566-AVUE), and instructions for completing the form. No other form of application will be accepted. Applications sent by fax, e-mail and mail will not be accepted.

Applicants using the Avue on-line system for these positions do not need to complete the Work History portion of the on-line profile; instead please attach the following after clicking the Attach Resume and Supporting Documents tab: a cover letter (highlighting relevant experience), a resume, a brief writing sample (10 pages or less) that is the applicant’s own work, and a current performance appraisal. If you are a current or former federal employee, please attach a copy of your most recent SF-50 (Notification of Personnel Action).

DUTIES:

The core duties of Trial Attorneys in the Voting Section are: conducting investigations to assess alleged violations of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) and other voting statutes enforced by the Section, including reviewing investigative files, materials and records, and applying relevant case law, interviewing witnesses, requesting additional information and documents, analyzing data and evidence, and drafting written recommendations for further investigation and/or enforcement litigation; developing cases for trial, including conducting written discovery and depositions, developing litigation and trial strategy, drafting complaints, motions and other court filings, representing the United States in federal court at arguments, evidentiary hearings and trial; negotiating settlement agreements and/or consent decrees resolving enforcement matters; assisting in coordinating the federal observer program during elections; and assisting in the administrative review of voting changes submitted pursuant to the preclearance requirements of the VRA. The complexity of the matters assigned, and the level of supervision required, varies depending on the Trial Attorney’s years of specialized experience.

Qualifications:

MINIMUM FEDERAL QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS:

REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS:

Applicants must possess a J.D. degree, be an active member of the bar in good standing (any jurisdiction), and have a minimum of three (3) years post-J.D. experience. Applicants must have substantial litigation experience, such as handling discovery, litigation strategy, motions practice, brief writing, interviewing witnesses, taking and defending depositions, trial preparation, trial practice, and negotiations. Applicants must have excellent interpersonal skills, be mature and self sufficient, communicate effectively orally and in writing, and possess excellent professional judgment.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

In addition, the following qualifications are preferred: (1) substantive knowledge of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) and other statutes enforced by the section; (2) familiarity with the various analytical approaches utilized to review voting changes under Section 5 of the VRA; (3) experience investigating and/or litigating voting rights or civil rights cases; (4) federal judicial experience; (5) experience serving as the lead attorney in federal court cases; (6) familiarity with statistical methodologies used in civil rights cases; (6) and fluency in Spanish, Chinese, Korean, or vietnamese languages.

Current salary and years of specialized experience will determine the appropriate salary level within the GS-14 to GS-15 range ($105,211.00 through $155,500.00 per annum). Final selection for these positions will be subject to budgetary funding constraints.

Other Information:

As part of the on-line application process, applicants are asked to provide – on a voluntary basis – demographic information on their race/ethnicity/national origin, sex and disability. Applicants are also asked to indicate how they learned about this vacancy. This information is used to determine if our recruitment efforts are reaching all segments of the population, consistent with federal equal employment opportunity laws.

No individual personnel selections are made based on this information. Your voluntary responses will be treated in a highly confidential manner, and any disability-related information will be kept confidential and used only in accordance with the Rehabilitation Act and 29 C.F.R. §1630.14(b)(1). Only summary data are reported and only in a format which cannot be broken out by individual applicants; no individual data will be provided to members of the public at any time. In addition, demographic data are separated from your application materials, and no individual data are provided to selecting officials or anyone else who can affect your application at any point during the selection process. No information from this form is ever placed in your personnel file, and failure to provide the requested information will not affect your application in any way. The authority for requesting this information is 42 U.S.C. § 2000e-16 and the Rehabilitation Act. This notice of the uses of this information is provided pursuant to Public Law 93-579 (“Privacy Act of 1974”), and the information provided becomes part of a Privacy Act System of Records as identified in 5 C.F.R. 552a; any disclosure of this record or information contained in this record is in accordance with routine uses found in OPM/GOVT-7, Applicant Race, Sex, National Origin, and Disability Status Records.

We encourage you to provide this vital information, which we cannot obtain from any other source; we can get it only from you. Thank you for helping us to provide better service.


The Civil Rights Division encourages qualified applicants with targeted disabilities to apply. Targeted disabilities are deafness, blindness, missing extremities, partial or complete paralysis, convulsive disorder, mental retardation, mental illness, severe distortion of limbs and/or spine.

October 13, 2016. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Barack Obama, Politics. 1 comment.

Melbourne University advertises female-only jobs in bid to remedy gender imbalance in maths

There is no academic subject that is more meritocratic, and less discriminatory, than math. What this college is doing is wrong.

For their entire careers at this university, these women will be known as the math professors who got hired not because of their abilities at math, but because of their gender.

What this school is doing is condescending and sexist, and it reinforces the false stereotype that woman are not good at math.

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-18/melbourne-university-opens-up-jobs-to-women-applicants-only/7426704

Melbourne University advertises female-only jobs in bid to remedy gender imbalance in maths

May 18, 2016

The University of Melbourne has taken the extraordinary step of opening up jobs to female applicants only in an attempt to drive change in the male-dominated area of mathematic academia.

Only about a quarter of all mathematics academics in Australia are female, and the university is now advertising three positions in its School of Mathematics and Statistics for female applicants only.

It is believed to be the first time it has limited applications to women only for permanent academic positions.

The jobs, in pure mathematics, applied mathematics and statistics, may range in level from lecturer, to senior lecturer, to associate professor, depending on the candidate’s experience.

The head of the School of Mathematics and Statistics, Professor Aleks Owczarek, said the decision had been taken to promote change.

“We clearly have an issue with attracting female applicants appropriately to our workforce,” Professor Owczarek said.

“So this is an agenda to attempt to address that.” Reaching gender equality in maths stubbornly slow

Women are notoriously underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, but mathematics has the lowest representation of all studies.

Lesley Ward, an Associate Professor of Mathematics at the University of South Australia, and chair of the Women in Maths Special Interest Group of the Australian Mathematical Society (WIMSIG), told ABC’s PM it gets worse the more senior the rank.

“At the first academic rank of associate lecturer it’s still only 30 per cent women, by the time you get up to the second highest rank of associate professor it’s down to under 20 per cent women,” Professor Ward said.

“At the highest rank, of professor, it’s 9 per cent women, according to the most recent data we have from 2014.”

She said there were many reasons for the low percentages, but a key cause was unconscious bias which sees men promoted more often than women.

Because of that, Professor Ward welcomed The University of Melbourne’s move, saying change so far had been slow.

“There have been many measures taken by universities and by individuals and by professional societies to help the advancement of women and the achievement of gender equity in these disciplines,” she said.

“In some disciplines it’s been harder than others and in mathematics it’s one where it’s taken a particularly long time.”

Equal Opportunity Act allows for positive discrimination

The University of Melbourne positions have been advertised using a special measure of the Victorian Equal Opportunity Act.

“The use of this kind of special measure that we’re using has been used with regards to Indigenous employment,” Professor Owczarek said.

“For this kind of positions, permanent continuing academic positions, I believe it might be the first time it’s been used,” he added.

Discrimination lawyer Rowan Skinner said the Act allows organisations to take actions to promote equality.

“The Act specifically permits an organisation to engage in what is overtly a discriminatory act, but for the purposes of ensuring that there is equal opportunity overall,” Mr Skinner said.

May 20, 2016. Tags: , , , , , , , . Dumbing down, Education, Math, Sexism. Leave a comment.

NPR unintentionally reveals the existence of “black privilege”

This three minute audio segment from NPR is called “Blind hiring, while well meaning, may create unintended consequences.”

It says that “blind hiring” is a process where job applicants are interviewed by computer instead of in person, so there is no bias regarding gender or race. Applicants are given online tests such as doing a math problem, or writing computer code.

I think this is a great idea.

In the NPR audio segment, the “unintended consequence” of “blind hiring” is explained by a black female college student, who complains that under “blind hiring,” she would not get special treatment.

In the comment section, someone wrote:

“The response of the black female student to blind hiring shows that in today’s job market male whites are not the privileged group.”

I think that commentor makes a great point.

It appears as if NPR has unintentionally revealed the existence of “black privilege.”

You can hear the three minute NPR audio at http://www.npr.org/2016/04/12/473912220/blind-hiring-while-well-meaning-may-create-unintended-consequences

 

April 12, 2016. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Politics, Racism. 4 comments.

The New York Times accidentally admitted that affirmative action hurts black college students

This recent New York Times article talks about a black student at Amherst College whom the New York Times claims is “unprepared academically” for the particular college that she is attending.

So I’m trying to think of all the reasons why someone who is “unprepared academically” for this particular college would get admitted to this particular college. Here are the reasons that I can think of:

1) Their parents made a big donation to the college.

2) They were admitted for their athletic ability.

3) They were admitted as a result of affirmative action.

If anyone here can think of any other reason, please post it in the comment section.

Anyway, it’s that third reason that I’m interested in for this discussion.

Without specifically mentioning affirmative action, the New York Times article makes a good case against affirmative action.

The student in question even says “I always feel like I need to prove to other people that I do belong here.”

I would respond to that by saying that anyone who is “unprepared academically” for this particular college does in fact not “belong” at this particular college.

Please note that no one said this student was “unprepared academically” for college in general. Instead, this student is “unprepared academically” for this particular college.

But there are thousands of other colleges in the U.S.

If affirmative action did not exist, then instead of getting admitted to this particular college, this student would have been admitted to a different college – one for which she was “prepared academically” instead of one for which she was “unprepared academically.”

Attending a college that is too difficult, is far worse than attending a college that matches your abilities. Affirmative action is causing terrible harm to these students. Colleges should get rid of affirmative action, so that each student will be matched up with a college that matches his or her own abilities.

Here is the relevant text from the New York Times article:

One young woman said she went to sleep at night wishing she would not wake up. Imani Marshall, a senior pre-med student from Chicago, who is black, felt a shudder of recognition and started to cry.

Ms. Marshall, who went to a selective public school in Chicago and came to Amherst on full financial aid, said she had felt unprepared academically and socially for Amherst. Yet she felt that by asking for help, she would undermine not just her own standing but that of her entire race.

“I feel like an impostor,” Ms. Marshall said the other day over lunch at the central dining hall. “I close myself off a lot of times from help. I always feel like I need to prove to other people that I do belong here.”

 

November 29, 2015. Tags: , , , , . Education, Racism. 1 comment.

Councilwoman wants police department to hire black police officers who can’t read well enough to do their job

A city councilwoman in Oakland, California, wants the police to lower their standards on their written test so more blacks can become police officers. The exam measures reading comprehension and other things that are necessary for the police to properly to their job.

You know what? I’m sick of fighting against this kind of nonsense. And I don’t live in that city anyway. So let them adopt her proposal. Let’s see what happens when a city hires police officers who don’t know how to read at the level that their job requires. It would make a great experiment.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports:

An Oakland City Council member who wants the Police Department to hire more African American officers has focused her attention on the written exam for new applicants — which is the point where many candidates get eliminated.

Councilwoman Desley Brooks suggested the department could consider lowering the passing score on the written test or getting rid of the exam altogether.

The exam… measures reading comprehension, and knowledge of certain vocabulary words — such as “corroborate.”

… the written exam is a critical indicator of whether an officer can fill out police reports, gather testimony from witnesses and comprehend the laws he or she has to enforce.

October 18, 2015. Tags: , , , , , , , , , . Dumbing down, Education, Politics, Racism. 3 comments.

Obama administration makes changes to Federal Aviation Administration because too many white males were passing their air traffic controller classes

The Obama administration has abandoned the old system for getting qualified air-traffic controller applicants because too many of them were white males, and replaced it with a new system that asks applicants how many different sports they played when they were in high school.

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July 5, 2015. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Barack Obama, Education, Politics, Racism. 4 comments.

Affirmative action at its finest

It is extremely easy to pass the New York Fire Department’s written test.
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May 18, 2015. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , . Barack Obama, Dumbing down, Political correctness, Racism. 4 comments.

Commander-in-Chief Obama allows lower military standards so unqualified women can serve in combat

NPR reports:
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December 27, 2013. Tags: , , , , , , , , . Barack Obama, Military, Politics, Sexism, War against achievement. 5 comments.

How come 100% of the drunk and sexually promiscuous imbeciles in the Obamacare ads are white?

Whatever happened to liberals’ love of racial diversity?

http://www.doyougotinsurance.com/


obamacare ad 1


obamacare ad 2

November 21, 2013. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , . Health care, Politics, Racism. 3 comments.

Obama claims that these 10 written questions from an employment test are “racist”

The Obama administration has accused the New York City Fire Department of “racial discrimination” because it required potential firefighters to take a written test.

Obama wants to force the New York City Fire Department to hire black and Hispanic applicants who failed this so-called “racist” written test.

Here are ten real examples of these so-called  “racist” questions from the New York City Fire Department test:

1. While operating at the scene of a car fire on a street, a firefighter was told to inform the officer of any dangerous conditions at the scene. Which one of the following conditions would be considered most dangerous to the firefighter operating at the scene of the car fire?

A) The car is leaking gasoline.

B) The car has four flat tires.

C) Vehicle traffic has come to a complete stop at the scene.

D) The car’s windshield is broken.

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September 18, 2013. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Dumb lawsuits, Racism. 12 comments.

In case you ever wondered what Barack Obama did as a “community organizer”

The Daily Caller reports:
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September 3, 2012. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , . Barack Obama, Politics, Racism. 3 comments.

“The Jeffersons” explains why you shouldn’t vote for someone just because they’re black

This season one episode of “The Jeffersons” is called “Like Father Like Son.” As is always the case with early seasons of this excellent show, the entire episode is worth watching. But the part I most want to draw your attention to runs from 13:08 to 16:28
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August 29, 2012. Tags: , , , , , , , , . Politics, Racism, Television. 4 comments.

Berkeley public high school considers cancelling its Advanced Placement classes because too many white students are succeeding

Human Events reports:
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August 25, 2012. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , . Education, Racism, Science, War against achievement. 13 comments.

Nearly all white Atlanta Symphony Orchestra turns away high school choirs for being too white

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra recently turned down the choruses from two high schools in Cobb County, Georgia – those of Walton and Lassiter High Schools.

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August 20, 2012. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , . Music, Racism. Leave a comment.

Judge orders New York City Fire Department to hire black and Hispanic applicants who failed “racist” written test

Here’s a situation which reminds me of the novel Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand:
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July 28, 2012. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , . Politics, Racism. 4 comments.